PSIR 502 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Theories of International Relations
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 502
Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course will help the students to both develop their critical thinking on main themes of IR such as conflict, security, power, self-determination, integration and globalization from different theoretical perspectives and apply various mainstream and critical theories of International Relations to real-world cases.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Can discuss the goal and importance of theory and theoretical researches.
  • Can explain the main assumptions, problematics, epistemological, ontological and methodological foundations and their solutions of those problematics with examples.
  • Can compare different theories in regard to the issues mentioned in article two.
  • Can analyze historical and contemporary events and problems by using theories of international relations
  • Can comment on the future of international relations and emerging trends in the framework of discussed theoretical approaches.
Course Content This graduate seminar surveys the main theoretical and analytical approaches encountered in the study of international relations.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction: key concepts Steve Smith, "Positivism and Beyond", in International Relations Theory: Positivism &Beyond, ed.Andrew Linklater et al, pp.11-46
2 Classical realism Dunne et al, Chapter 3 Hans Morgenthau, ‘Six Principles of Realism’https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/morg6.htm
3 Structural (Neo)realism Dunne et al, Chapter 4. Fred Halliday and Justin Rosenberg, ‘An Interview with Kenneth Waltz’, Review of International Studies 24(3) (1998): 371-386. Kenneth N.Waltz, "Realist Thought and Neorealist Theory",Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 44, No. 1,pp.21-37
4 Liberalism and its variants Dunne et al, Chapters 5 & 6. ‘Interview with Robert Keohane’http://www.theory-talks.org/2008/05/theory-talk-9.html
5 Constructivism Alexander Wendt (1992) “Anarchy is what states make of it: The social construction of power politics”, International Organization 46 (spring): 391-425. Dunne et al, Chapter 10.
6 NeoMarxism and Critical theory Dunne et al, Chapters 8 & 9 Cox, Robert (1983) ‘Gramsci, Hegemony and IR’, Millennium 12(2): 162-175.
7 Midterm
8 English School of international society Dunne et al, Chapter 7. Barry Buzan,"The English School: An Underexploited Resource in IR", Review of International Studies, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Jul., 2001), pp. 471-48
9 Post-structuralism & Postcolonialism Dunne et al, Chapters 11 & 13 Gurminder K Bhambra (2010) Historical sociology, international relations and connected histories, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 23:1, 127-143
10 Themes and Theoretical Perspectives (Globalization) Steven Lukes. 2005. “Power and the Battle for Hearts and Minds”, Millennium - Journal of International Studies June 2005 vol. 33 no. 3 477-493. Dunne et al, Chapter 12
11 Theories of war Mary Kaldor (2013) ‘In Defence of New Wars’, Stability: International Journal of Security and Development, vol.2, no.1.
12 Theorizing security Matt McDonald (2008) “Securitization and the Construction of Security”. European Journal of International Relations 14(4): 563-587.Barry Buzan, Ole Waever and Jaap de Wilde, Security: A new Framework for Analysis, (London: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998),pp.1-48.
13 The future of IR Theory Dunne et al, Chapter 16. Amitav Acharya and Barry Buzan (2017) ‘Why is there no Non-Western International Relations Theory? Ten years on’, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific 17:341–370.
14 General overview of the course and Class presentations
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Tim Dunne et al, International Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity, 2nd edition, OUP, Oxford, 2010.

 

Suggested Readings/Materials Please see the readings for each week.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
7
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
20
Final Exam
1
30
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest