PSIR 503 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Comparative Politics
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 503
Fall
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students will be able to interpret how differnet regime types have emerged.
  • They will be able to compare politial institutions in different countries.
  • They will be able provide solutions to different political and institutional problems.
  • They will be to use comparative research methods.
  • They will be able to compare political institutions in their country with those in other countries.
Course Content

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Presentation and an overview of the course
2 What is comparative politics? Caramani, Introduction Chap.s 1- 3.
3 Nation-State Caramani, Ch.4. Fukuyama, Francis. 2004. State‐Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century. Cornell University Press.
4 Regime types: Democracy Caramani, Ch.5• Geddes, Barbara. 1999. ‘What Do We Know About Democratization After Twenty Years?’ Annual Review of Political Science, 2:115‐44.
5 Regime types: Autocracy Caramani, Ch.6 • Diamond, Larry. 2002. ‘Thinking about Hybrid Regimes.’ Journal of Democracy 13: 21‐35. • Linz, Juan. 2000. Totalitarian and Authoritarian Regimes. Boulder: Lynne Rienner.
6 Electoral systems Caramani, Ch.10 • Benoit, Kenneth. 2007. ‘Electoral Laws as Political Consequences: Explaining the Origins and Change of Electoral Institutions.’ Annual Review of Political Science 10: 363‐90. • Lijphart, Arend. 1994. Electoral Systems and Party Systems: A Study of Twenty‐Seven Democracies, 1945‐1990. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
7 First Exam -
8 Political parties and party systems Caramani, Ch.s 12-13 • Kitschelt, Herbert. 1994. The Transformation of European Social Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
9 Executives Caramani, Ch.8 • Blais, André, Louis Massicotte and Agnieszka Dobrynska. 1997. ‘Direct presidential elections: A world summary.’ Electoral Studies 16(4): 441‐455. • Linz, Juan. 1990. ‘The Perils of Presidentialism.’ Journal of Democracy 1(1): 51‐69.
10 Legislatures Caramani, Ch.7 • Carey, John. 2008. Legislative Voting and Accountability. Cambridge University Press.
11 Social Movements Caramani, Ch.14-16 • Foley, Michael ve Bob Edwards. 1998. ‘Beyond Tocqueville: Civil Society and Social Capital in Comparative Perspective.’ American Behavioral Scientist. 42(1): 5‐20.
12 Economy and welfare state Caramani, Ch. 21-22. Burkhart, Ross E. 1997. ‘Comparative Democracy and Income Distribution: Shape and Direction of the Causal Arrow.’ Journal of Politics 59(1): 148‐164.
13 Review of the Semester  
14 Review of the Semester  
15 Final Exam
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Course textbook is Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.\n\n ACADEMIC HONESTY:\nHonesty and trust are the most fundamental pillars of learning and are necessary foundation for success and academic freedom in a university. Hence, any behavior that jeopardizes the learning environment by violating the rules of academic honesty will not be tolerated or condoned:\nViolations of academic honesty include but are not limited to:\nCheating or facilitating cheating\n• looking or attempting to look at another student's answers or allowing others to copy one's answers, \n• copying other student’s in-class or take-home exam answers or letting others use take-home exam answers,\n• using "cheat sheet," pre-programmed calculator if not allowed by the instructor,\n• having someone else prepare the term project or homework or letting others use one’s homework/term project/paper,\n• Assistance of another person in preparation of a tem paper/homework/project if not allowed by the instructor,\n• Taking an exam for another student,\n• Purchasing term projects or homework or other assignments,\n• Signing in place of another student using their name/signature/student id number,\nPlagiarism\n• showing the work of another as one's own,\n• Not properly citing an earlier own work, \n• Submitting the same homework/paper/term project in one more one course if not allowed by the instructor,\n• Inaccurately or inadequately citing sources including those from the Internet,\nViolations of academic honesty can result in disciplinary action, as stated in the "Student Disciplinary Rules and Regulation" of the University. http://www.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/13 and http://kariyer.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/81\nBy enrolling in the University, each student is assumed to have read the rules and regulations regarding academic dishonesty, and lack of knowledge of this policy is not an acceptable defense. \n
Suggested Readings/Materials • Fukuyama, Francis. 2004. State‐Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century. Cornell University Press. • Geddes, Barbara. 1999. ‘What Do We Know About Democratization After Twenty Years?’ Annual Review of Political Science, 2:115‐44. • Diamond, Larry. 2002. ‘Thinking about Hybrid Regimes.’ Journal of Democracy 13: 21‐35. • Linz, Juan. 2000. Totalitarian and Authoritarian Regimes. Boulder: Lynne Rienner. • Benoit, Kenneth. 2007. ‘Electoral Laws as Political Consequences: Explaining the Origins and Change of Electoral Institutions.’ Annual Review of Political Science 10: 363‐90. • Lijphart, Arend. 1994. Electoral Systems and Party Systems: A Study of Twenty‐Seven Democracies, 1945‐1990. Oxford: Oxford University Press. • Kitschelt, Herbert. 1994. The Transformation of European Social Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. • Blais, André, Louis Massicotte ve Agnieszka Dobrynska. 1997. ‘Direct presidential elections: A world summary.’ Electoral Studies 16(4): 441‐455. • Linz, Juan. 1990. ‘The Perils of Presidentialism.’ Journal of Democracy 1(1): 51‐69. • Carey, John. 2008. Legislative Voting and Accountability. Cambridge University Press. • Foley, Michael ve Bob Edwards. 1998. ‘Beyond Tocqueville: Civil Society and Social Capital in Comparative Perspective.’ American Behavioral Scientist. 42(1): 5‐20. • Burkhart, Ross E. 1997. ‘Comparative Democracy and Income Distribution: Shape and Direction of the Causal Arrow.’ Journal of Politics 59(1): 148‐164.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
-
-
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
20
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
37
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
35
Final Exam
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest