PSIR 506 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Turkey-EU Relations
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 506
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to explain the fundamental EU enlargement theories (rationalism and constructivism)
  • to explain the dynamics of the process of enlargement
  • to examine Turkey-EU relations in a historical perspective
  • to apply the theories of EU enlargement to Turkey-EU relations
  • to make comparisons with other enlargement rounds
  • to analyze the political, legal and official dimensions of Turkey’s EU accession process
Course Content

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Situating Turkey’s EU accession in EU studies/Reading and Presentation Skills -Schimmelfennig, F. and Sedelmeier, U. (2002) ‘Theorizing EU enlargement: research focus, hypotheses, and the state of research’, Journal of European Public Policy 9(4): 500-528.
3 From the Association Agreement 1963 to the Custom Union 1995 - Aydın, Mustafa (2003) ‘The Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy, and Turkey’s European Vocation’ The Review of International Affairs 3(2):306-331. - Kabaalioglu (1998) The Custom Union: A final step before Turkey’s Accession to the EU, 113-140 - Arıkan, H. (2003) Turkey and the EU (Ashgate): 59-69 - Hartler, Christina and Sam Laird (1999) The EU Model and Turkey. A Case for Thanksgiving, Journal of World Trade (33) 3, 147-165 - World Bank (2014) Evaluation of the EU-Turkey Customs Union, http://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/Worldbank/document/eca/turkey/tr-eu-customs-union-eng.pdf
4 Eastern Enlargement, Luxemburg 1997 and Helsinki 1999 -MüftülerBaç, M. and Mclaren, L. M. (2003) ‘Enlargement preferences and policymaking in the European Union: Impacts on Turkey’, European Integration 25: 17-30 - -Barnes, I. and Barnes, P. (2007) ‘Enlargement’, in Cini, M. (ed) European Union Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press): 421-440 - -Eralp, A. ‘Turkey in the enlargement process: From Luxembourg to Helsinki’ - -Susanna Verney (2007) The dynamics of EU accession: Turkish travails in comparative perspective - -Yilmaz, Bahri (2008) The Relation of Turkey with the EU: Candidate forever?, Center for European Studies Working Paper Series, No. 167, chapter 3-4
5 From Candidate Status 1999 to the Opening of Accession Talks in 2005 -Akçapar, B. (2007) Turkey’s new European era (Rowman and Littlefield): 11-56. - -Schimmelfennig, Frank (2008), ‘Entrapped again: The way to EU membership negotiations with Turkey’, UCD Dublin European Institute, Working Paper 8, http://www.ucd.ie/dei/wp/WP_08-8_Schimmelfennig.pdf - McLaren, Lauren (2007), ‘Explaining Opposition to Turkish Membership of the EU’, European Union Politics, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 251 – 278
6 The organization and progress of the accession talks - European Commission: Understanding Enlargement, http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/pdf/publication/enl-understand_en.pdf (online) - -Ugur, M. (2010) Open-Ended Membership Prospect and Commitment Credibility: Explaining the Deadlock in EU–Turkey Accession Negotiations, Journal of Common Market Studies, 4(4): 967-991. - Marc Pierini (2017) EU-Turkey Relations Confined to Core Priorities, https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/74791
7 Europeanisation of Turkey - -Tocci, N. (2005) ‘Europeanization in Turkey: Trigger or Anchor for Reform?’, South European Society and Politics 10(1): 73-83 -Bürgin, A. (2017) Why the EU still matters in Turkish Domestic Politics: Insights from Recent Reforms in Migration Policy 21(1):105-118 Schimmelfennig, F. (2003) ‘Costs, Commitment and Compliance: The Impact of EU Democratic Conditionality on Latvia, Slovakia and Turkey’, Journal of Common Market Studies 41(3): 495518 (online) - -Bürgin, Alexander (2011): Why Turkey is ready for a readmission agreement, Journal of European Public Policy (online) -
8 Midterm Exam
9 Economical and Political Implications of Turkey’s EU accession (1) -Ülgen, S. (2017) Trade As Turkey’s EU Anchor, Carnegie Europe, https://carnegieeurope.eu/2017/12/13/trade-as-turkey-s-eu-anchor-pub-75002; - Kirişci/Ekim (2015) Why an EU-Turkey Customs Union Upgrade is Good for Turkey, The German Marshall Fund of the US; http://www.gmfus.org/publications/why-eu-turkey-customs-union-upgrade-good-turkey, http://www.gmfus.org/publications/why-eu-turkey-customs-union-upgrade-good-turkey Ugur, M. (2008) Economic implications of Turkish EU membership: the advantage of tying one’s hand, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18547/1/MPRA_paper_18547.pdf -MüftülerBaç, M. (2004) ‘Turkey’s accession to the European Union: Institutional and Security Challenges’, Perceptions, Autumn: 29-43 (required: page 33-34)
10 Economical and Political Implications of Turkey’s EU accession (2) - Kirişci and Toygür (2019) Turkey’s new presidential system and a changing west, Implications for Turkish foreign policy and Turkish-West relations, Brookings, https://www.brookings.edu/research/turkeys-new-presidential-system-and-a-changing-west/; Müftüler-Bac/Gürsoy, Y. (2010): Is there a Europeanization of Turkey’s Foreign Policy, Turkish Studies, vol.11, no. 3 -Öniş, Ziya (2014) Turkey and the Arab Revolutions: Boundaries of Regional Power Influence in a Turbulent Middle East, Mediterranean Politics 19(2), 203-219.
11 Student Presentations
12 Student Presentations
13 Implications of Turkey’s EU membership prospects on European and national identities - Delhey, Jan (2007) Do enlargements make the EU less cohesive? An analysis of trust between EU nationalities, Journal of Common Market Studies, vol 45,2, 253-79 -Parker, Owen (2009), ’Cosmopolitan Europe and the EU-Turkey question: the politics of a common destiny’, Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 16, No. 7, pp. 1085-1101 -MacMillan, Cahterine (2010) Which identity for the European Union, http://www.e-ir.info/2010/03/21/which-identity-for-the-eu-implications-of-and-for-turkeys-accession/ (Online) -
14 Outlook: Future of EU Turkey Relations Müftüler-Bac (2017) Turkey’s future with the European Union: an alternative model of differentiated integration, Turkish Studies 18(3), Bürgin (2018): Despite the growing alienation between Turkey and the EU: A continuation of the accession process remains the best option, Orient 59(3) 24-32
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

Pieces from prestigious national and international press.

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EU Studies Certificate: The program is open for all 3rd grade students of any undergraduate programs of the IUE.  Students with an average of minimum 2.00 GPA in four EU-related courses, including one compulsory course (PSIR 201 - History and Institutions of the EU) and 3 elective courses will receive the Certificate. ​

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
25
Final Exam
1
25
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
75
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
25
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
40
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest