PSIR 554 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Public Opinion
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 554
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of this course is to examines the nature of public opinion across countries. The class will focus on the conceptualization, measurement and formation of public attitudes. Students will discuss the strucutre and dynamics of voting behavior, party preferences and public support for various issues including wars, foreign policy and the EU.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students will be able to will be able to understand how to design surveys and how to interpret their results.
  • They will be able to evaluate how people form opinions.
  • Students will be able to will be able to understand how citizens influence government policies.
  • Students will be able analyze who support Turkey’s EU membership.
  • Students will be able to discuss whether European public has favorable attitudes towards Turkey’s EU candidacy.
Course Content Students discuss the structure and dynamics of public opinion around the world.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Does Public Opinion Matter? Gilens, M. 2005. “Inequality and Democratic Responsiveness.” Public Opinion Quarterly 69(5): 778-96. Jacobs, L. R., and Shapiro, R. 2000. Politicians Don’t Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Chapter 8.
3 Measuring Public Opinion with Surveys Asher, H. 2001. Polling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should Know. Washington DC: Congressional Quarterly Press. Chapters 3 and 8.
4 Economic Self-Interest Citrin, J., and Green, D.. 1990. “The Self-Interest Motive in American Public Opinion.” Research in Micropolitics 3: 1-28.
5 Group Identities Conover, PJ. 1984. “The Inuence of Group Identi_cations on Political Perception and Evaluation.” Journal of Politics, 46(3):760-785, 1984. Kramer, R.M. and Brewer, M.B. 1984. “Effects of Group Identity on Resource Use in a Simulated Commons Dilemma.” J Pers Soc Psychol, 46(5):1044-57, 1984. Brady, H.E. and Sniderman, P.M. 1985. “Attitude Attribution: A Group Basis for Political Reasoning.” American Political Science Review, 79(4):1061-78.
6 The Media Iyengar, S., Peters, M.D. and Kinder, D.R. 1982. “Experimental Demonstrations of the \Not-So-Minimal" Consequences of Television News Programs.” American Political Science Review, 76(4):848-858. Bartels, L.M. 1993. Messages Received: The Political Impact of Media Exposure.” American Political Science Review, 87(2):267-285. Nelson, T.E., Clawson, R. A., and Oxley, Z.M. 1997. “Media Framing of a Civil Liberties Conict and Its Effect on Tolerance.” American Political Science Review, 91:567-584.
7 Public Opinion and Foreign Affairs Peffley, M., and Hurwitz, J. 1992. “International Events and Foreign Policy Beliefs: Public Responses to Changing Soviet-U.S. Relations.” American Journal of Political Science 36 (2): 431-461.
8 Midterm
9 Partisanship, Voter Turnout and Vote choice Esmer, Y. 1995. "Parties and the Electorate: A Comparative Analysis of Voter Profiles of Turkish Political Parties," in Çiğdem Balim et. al. (eds.) Turkey: Political, Social and Economic Challenges in the 1990s. Leiden, New York, Köln: E. J. Brill. 5. Kalaycıoğlu, E. 1999."The Shaping of Party Preferences in Turkey: Coping with the Post-Cold War Era" New Perspectives on Turkey, 20: 47-76. Çarkoğlu, A. 2008. "Ideology or Economic Pragmatism?: Profiling Turkish Voters in 2007," Turkish Studies, 9(2): 317 -344.
10 Turkish public attitudes toward the EU Çarkoglu, A. 2003. “Who Wants Full Membership? Characteristics of Turkish Public Support for EU Membership”, in Ali Çarkoglu and Barry Rubin (eds) Turkey and the European Union: Domestic Politics, Economic Integration, and International Dynamics, London: Frank Cass, pp. 195–218. Kentmen, Ç. 2008. “Determinants of Support for EU Membership in Turkey: Islamic Attachments, Utilitarian Considerations and National Identity.” European Union Politics 9(4): 487 - 510. de Vreese, C. H., Boomgaarden, H. G. And Semetko, H. A. 2008. “Hard and Soft: Public Support for Turkish Membership in the EU.” European Union Politics, 9(4): 511-530.
11 European attitudes toward Turkey’s EU Membership de Vreese, C. H. and Boomgaarden, H. G. 2006. Media Effects on Public Opinion about the Enlargement of the European Union. Journal of Common Market Studies. 44(2): 409-436.
12 Public Opinion and Democratic Values Norris, P. (1999) ‘Introduction: The growth of critical citizens?’ In: P. Norris (ed) Critical Citizens: Global Support for Democratic Governance. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-28.
13 Public opinion and war Hurwitz, J., Peffley, M. and Seligson, M. 1993. “Foreign Policy Belief Systems in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Costa Rica.” International Studies Quarterly 37 (3): 245-270.
14 Review for the final
15 Final examination
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials Gilens, M. 2005. “Inequality and Democratic Responsiveness.” Public Opinion Quarterly 69(5): 778-96. Jacobs, L. R., and Shapiro, R. 2000. Politicians Don’t Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Chapter 8. Asher, H. 2001. Polling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should Know. Washington DC: Congressional Quarterly Press. Chapters 3 and 8. Citrin, J., and Green, D.. 1990. “The Self-Interest Motive in American Public Opinion.” Research in Micropolitics 3: 1-28. Conover, PJ. 1984. “The Inuence of Group Identi_cations on Political Perception and Evaluation.” Journal of Politics, 46(3):760-785, 1984. Kramer, R.M. and Brewer, M.B. 1984. “Effects of Group Identity on Resource Use in a Simulated Commons Dilemma.” J Pers Soc Psychol, 46(5):1044-57, 1984. Brady, H.E. and Sniderman, P.M. 1985. “Attitude Attribution: A Group Basis for Political Reasoning.” American Political Science Review, 79(4):1061-78. Iyengar, S., Peters, M.D. and Kinder, D.R. 1982. “Experimental Demonstrations of the \Not-So-Minimal" Consequences of Television News Programs.” American Political Science Review, 76(4):848-858. Bartels, L.M. 1993. Messages Received: The Political Impact of Media Exposure.” American Political Science Review, 87(2):267-285. Nelson, T.E., Clawson, R. A., and Oxley, Z.M. 1997. “Media Framing of a Civil Liberties Conict and Its Effect on Tolerance.” American Political Science Review, 91:567-584. Esmer, Y. 1995. "Parties and the Electorate: A Comparative Analysis of Voter Profiles of Turkish Political Parties," in Çiğdem Balim et. al. (eds.) Turkey: Political, Social and Economic Challenges in the 1990s. Leiden, New York, Köln: E. J. Brill. 5. Kalaycıoğlu, E. 1999."The Shaping of Party Preferences in Turkey: Coping with the Post-Cold War Era" New Perspectives on Turkey, 20: 47-76. Çarkoğlu, A. 2008. "Ideology or Economic Pragmatism?: Profiling Turkish Voters in 2007," Turkish Studies, 9(2): 317 -344. Peffley, M., and Hurwitz, J. 1992. “International Events and Foreign Policy Beliefs: Public Responses to Changing Soviet-U.S. Relations.” American Journal of Political Science 36 (2): 431-461. de Vreese, C. H. and Boomgaarden, H. G. 2006. Media Effects on Public Opinion about the Enlargement of the European Union. Journal of Common Market Studies. 44(2): 409-436. Norris, P. (1999) ‘Introduction: The growth of critical citizens?’ In: P. Norris (ed) Critical Citizens: Global Support for Democratic Governance. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-28. Hurwitz, J., Peffley, M. and Seligson, M. 1993. “Foreign Policy Belief Systems in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Costa Rica.” International Studies Quarterly 37 (3): 245-270.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
20
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
30
Study Hours Out of Class
33
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
7
Final Exam
1
12
    Total
679

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest