PSIR 555 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Foreign Policy Analysis
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 555
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The main objective of this advanced course is to critically analyze various theoretical perspectives which focus on foreign policy formulation and implementation processes, actors that play a role in these processes and foreign policy instruments. The course focuses on political, economic, institutional, social and psychological/ psychoanalytical dimensions of foreign policy by considering domestic and international factors.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to identify the motivations of actors formulating foreign policy.
  • to identify the actors who play a role in foreign policy formulation process from a Liberal perspective.
  • to explain the steps of rational model.
  • to classify causal factors in rational model.
  • to distinguish the variables at different levels of analysis.
  • to discuss the explanatory power of societal factors in foreign policy formulation process.
Course Content This advanced course examines the capacity of states to meet their economic and political foreign policy goals. Furthermore, it critically evaluates the relationship between human rights, foreign policy, and diplomacy.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introducing foreign policy analysis: Differences between domestic and foreign policy, Why and how do we do foreign policy analysis? Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 1
2 External and Internal Sources of Foreign Policy: Structure and Agency debate, Levels of Analysis problem Walter Carlsnaes (1992) “The Agency-Structure Problem in Foreign Policy Analysis”, International Studies Quarterly 36(3): 245-270.
3 International System and National Power Seckin Baris Gulmez (2016): Turkish foreign policy as an anomaly: revisionism and irredentism through diplomacy in the 1930s, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 44, no.1, p. 30-44
4 Rational decision-making models Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 14
5 Cognitive, Psychological and Behavioral approaches Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 7
6 Realism and foreign policy Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 2
7 Liberalism and foreign policy Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 3
8 Social theories I: Constructivism & Marxism Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 4; Immanuel Wallerstein, World-Systems Analysis, Duke Uni. Press.
9 Midterm Exam
10 Social theories II: English School Barry Buzan (2014) An introduction to the English school of international relations: the societal approach. Polity Press, Cambridge.
11 Ethical foreign policy Smith, Hadfield & Dunne, Chapter 22
12 Diplomacy Berridge, Chapters 7, 9 & 10.
13 Public Diplomacy Geoffrey Wiseman, “Polylateralism: Diplomacy’s Third Dimension” Public Diplomacy Magazine, Issue 4 (Summer 2010), 24–39. http://publicdipl omacymag azine.com/ polylaterali sm/
14 Concluding Remarks
15 Review
16 Review

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Steve Smith, Amelia Hadfield, Timothy Dunne (eds.) Foreign policy: theories, actors, cases. 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University

Press

Suggested Readings/Materials

Morton H. Halperin, Priscilla A. Clapp and Arnold Kanter. Bureaucratic Politics and Foreign Policy, 2nd edition.

G. R. Berridge. Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, Second Edition

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
40
Final Exam
1
60
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
60
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
44
Final Exam
1
60
    Total
180

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest