PSIR 558 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Middle East Politics
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 558
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives The objective of this course is to provide the students a holistic understanding of Middle Eastern politics. In this pursuit a historical overview will be utilized to disentangle the dynamics behind nationstate formation and underline the unique features of the Middle East as region in the worldsystem. A secondary objective of this course is to challenge conventional wisdom towards the region by making use of certain conceptual interventions.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The students who succeeded in this course; will be able to examine the historical background of the Middle East region.
  • will be able to analyze the Middle East's political, economic and ideological position within the context of local actors, regional powers and international allies.
  • will be able to explain both historical and current background of problems of peace, stability and democratization in the Middle East.
  • will be able to discuss the states in the Middle East within the conceptual framework of nation-state and failed state.
  • will be able to discuss the reasons of minorities, ethnic conflicts and sectarian rivalries in the Middle East and the Arab world.
Course Content The course will begin with a historical overview of the remapping of the Middle East. In addition a comparative historical analysis will help to locate the Middle East within the larger world historical context. Finally, a review of contemporary developments in world politics will provide information on major conceptual issues such as Orientalism, the rise of political Islam, Islamophobia and more.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 The Transformation Era Cleveland Ch. 4 Forging a New Synthesis, Ch. 7 The Response of Islamic Society, Ch. 9 WWI and the End of the Ottoman Order
3 WWI and the Disintegration of the Empire Fromkin Part I At the Crossroads of History
4 The Colonial Heritage Fromkin Part III Britain is drawn into the M. Eastern Quagmire Part V The Allies at the Nadir of Their Fortunes
5 Waves of Independence Cleveland Part III The Struggle for Independence: The Interwar Era to the End of WWII
6 Independent Middle East Cleveland Part IV The Independent M. East from the End of WWII to the 1970s
7 Midterm Exam
8 New Dynamics, New Challenges Cleveland Part V A Time of Upheaval and Renewal: The Middle East from the 1970s to the 2000s
9 New Dynamics, New Challenges Cleveland Part V A Time of Upheaval and Renewal: The Middle East from the 1970s to the 2000s
10 Orientalism Lockman Ch. 6 Said’s Orientalism: a book and its aftermath, Ch. 7 After Orientalism?
11 Islam Esposito and Burgat Introduction, Ch. 3 Islam and Civil Society
12 Islam in Europe Esposito and Burgat Ch. 8 The Growing Islamization of Europe, Ch. 10 Muslim Minorities in Europe: the Silent Revolution
13 Student presentations
14 Student presentations
15 student presentations
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials A History of the Modern Middle East William L. Cleveland and Martin Bunton, Westview Press, 2009. A Peace to End All Peace David Fromkin, Holt and Co., 2001. Contending Visions of the Middle East Zachary Lockman, Cambridge UP, 2004. Modernizing Islam: Religion in the Public Sphere in Europe and the Middle East John L. Esposito and Francois Burgat (eds.)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
4
Field Work
1
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
1
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
20
Final Exam
1
21
    Total
153

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest