PSIR 562 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Art and Politics in the Modern Era
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 562
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims both at addressing the approaches of the political authorities to art in the modern era and at analyzing the relations various artistic groups and/or movements with the political power. This course has the claim that the prevailing political and cultural atmosphere of each era influences art with a historical and sociological perspective.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Classify the ideologies that different artistic movements engage with
  • Compare and contrast various dictatorships according to the artistic preferences
  • Discuss the changes in the artistic discourses within the broader social and political framework
  • Describe at least two modern artistic currents by relating them to the agendas of politics in which they are born of
  • Discuss the functions of art for the interests of political authorities
  • Discuss the potential of art in challenging the existing power relations in society
Course Content By following a chronological line, we are going to examine the interactions between the artistic sphere and politics in the framework of the topics such as modernization, nation-building, nationalism, World Wars, dictatorships, ideologies, Cold War, late-industrialization, identity politics, globalization and transnationalism.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction: Course objectives, content, methodology Presentation and overview of the course.
2 Art and Politics? Conceptual framework: Modernity, modernism, modernization Matei Calinescu, “The Idea of Modernity”, Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism, Durham: Duke University Press, 1987, pp.13-94. Suggested Reading: Lev Kreft, “Sanatın Siyaseti ve Siyasetin Sanatı”, içinde Ali Artun (der.), Sanat/Siyaset: Kültür Çağında Sanat ve Kültürel Politika, İletişim Yay. 2008, pp. 9 - 48.
3 Modernism Marshall Berman, “Modernity-Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”, All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity, New York: Penguin Books, 1988, pp. 15 - 36.
4 World Wars I & II, and the Avant-garde Kenneth Silver, Esprit de Corps: The Art of the Parisian Avant-Garde and the First World War: 1914-1925, London: Thames and Hudson, 1989. Romy Golan, Modernity and Nostalgia: Art and Politics in France Between the Wars, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995.
5 Populism, Ideology and Art Eric Hobsbawm, “Foreword”, in, (eds.) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 11-15. Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
6 Dictatorships I (1930-1945) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, “Selectors’ Introduction”, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 16-30. Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
7 Dictatorships II (1930-1945) Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
8 Midterm Exam
9 Late-industrialization and modernization Mary Matossian, “Ideologies of Delayed Development”, in (der.) J. Hutchinson and A. D. Smith, Nationalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 218-225. Sibel Bozdoğan, “Art and Architecture in Modern Turkey: The Republican Period”, in (der.) Reşat Kasaba, The Cambridge History of Turkey: Vol. 4: Turkey in the Modern World, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp. 419-471.
10 Nation-building and Modernism Duygu Köksal, “Domesticating the Avant-Garde in a Nationalist Era: Aesthetic Modernism in 1930s Turkey”, New Perspectives on Turkey, Vol 52, 2015, pp. 29-53. Cemren Altan, “Visual Narration of a Nation: Painting and National Identity in Turkey”, Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, Vol.4, No.2, 2004, pp. 2-17.
11 Cold War Serge Guilbaut, “Introduction”, How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art?, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983, pp. 1-16. Frances Stonor Saunders, “Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’”, Independent, 21 October 2005.
12 Post-Colonialism and Identity politics Ania Loomba, “Defining the Terms”, Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Routledge, New York, 1998, pp. 1-19. Hannah Elansary, “Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse.”, Jadaliyya, 1 September 2014.
13 Globalization, transnationalism and contemporary art Dessislava Dimova and Eckhart J. Gillen, “Globalization and Cultural Identity: The perspective of Contemporary Art”, background paper,Salzburg trilogy,Bertelsmann Sitftung, 2017, pp. 60-71. Justin O'Connor, and Gu Xin. "A new modernity? The arrival of ‘creative industries’ in China." International journal of cultural studies 9.3 (2006), pp. 271-283. Brettany Shannon. “The ‘Dubai Effect’: The Gulf, the art world and globalization”, The Emerging Asian City: Concomitant Urbanities & Urbanisms, 2013, pp.254-264.
14 Review of the semester
15 Final Exam
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

Ania Loomba, “Defining the Terms”, Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Routledge, New York, 1998, pp. 1-19.

Brettany Shannon. “The ‘Dubai Effect’: The Gulf, the art world and globalization”, The Emerging Asian City: Concomitant Urbanities & Urbanisms, 2013, pp.254-264.

Cemren Altan, “Visual Narration of a Nation: Painting and National Identity in Turkey”, Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, Vol.4, No.2, 2004, pp. 2-17.

Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, “Selectors’ Introduction”, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 16-30.

Dessislava Dimova and Eckhart J. Gillen, “Globalization and Cultural Identity: The perspective of Contemporary Art”, background paper,Salzburg trilogy,Bertelsmann Sitftung, 2017, pp. 60-71.

Duygu Köksal, “Domesticating the Avant-Garde in a Nationalist Era: Aesthetic Modernism in 1930s Turkey”, New Perspectives on Turkey, Vol 52, 2015, pp. 29-53.

Edward Said, Orientalism, Vintage Books, 1978.

Eric Hobsbawm, “Foreword”, in, (eds.) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 11-15.

Frances Stonor Saunders, “Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’”, Independent, 21 October 2005.

Hannah Elansary, “Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse.”, Jadaliyya, 1 September 2014.

Justin O'Connor, and Gu Xin. "A new modernity? The arrival of ‘creative industries’ in China." International journal of cultural studies 9.3 (2006), pp. 271-283.

Kenneth Silver, Esprit de Corps: The Art of the Parisian Avant-Garde and the First World War: 1914-1925, London: Thames and Hudson, 1989.

Marshall Berman, “Modernity-Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”, All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity, New York: Penguin Books, 1988, pp. 15-36.

 

Mary Matossian, “Ideologies of Delayed Development”, içinde (der.) J. Hutchinson ve A. D. Smith, Nationalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 218-225.

 

Matei Calinescu, “The Idea of Modernity”, Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism, Durham: Duke University Press, 1987, pp.13-94.

 

Romy Golan, Modernity and Nostalgia: Art and Politics in France Between the WarsNew Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995.

 

Serge Guilbaut, How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art?, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.

 

Sibel Bozdoğan, “Art and Architecture in Modern Turkey: The Republican Period”, içinde (der.) Reşat Kasaba, The Cambridge History of Turkey: Vol. 4: Turkey in the Modern World, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp. 419-471.

 

Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
10
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
15
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
12
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
5
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
201

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and use them competently.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically the relationships between various factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture.

X
3

To be able to determine and question the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
4

To be able to identify the political and cultural conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnicity, gender and religion at national and international levels.

X
5

To be able to gather and analyze data by using scientific research methods.

X
6

To be able to analyze and evaluate the historical continuity and changes observed in the relations between the actors and institutions of national and international politics.

X
7

To be able to present individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in generating solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to determine the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in domestic and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare a thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments in Political Science and International Relations and participate the debates in academic meetings through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest