PSIR 601 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Research Methods
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 601
Fall
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives This course is designed to equip graduate students with tools necessary for doing empirical and systematic research in political science and international relations. Students will learn to identify research questions and hypotheses, conduct a literature review, and collect qualitative and quantitative data.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • To assess the challenges of conducting social science research.
  • To evaluate strengths and weaknesses of different research method techniques.
  • To formulate testable hypotheses.
  • To identify the appropriate data and sources.
  • To prepare interview and survey questions.
  • To identify ethical issues in social sciences.
Course Content This course provides students the basic skills needed to conduct political analysis. All students are expected to come to class having done the required readings of the week and engage in class discussions. Academic Integrity: Any kind of academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarizing, will not be tolerated. Academic dishonesty will be pursued with disciplinary action and will result in an “F” grade for the class.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction – syllabus presentation and explanation
2 Studying Politics Scientifically KKV, Chapter 1. Bhattacherjee, Chapter. 1. Bevir, Mark. “Meta-methodology: Clearing the Underbrush.” In The Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology, Chapter 3. Brady, Henry and David Collier, pp. 3-14. Recommended: Almond, Gabriel. 1988. Separate Tables: Schools and Sects in Political Science. PS: Political Science and Politics 21(4): 828-842.
3 Research Questions and Theories KKV, pp. 99 – 114. Gerring, 37-73. Geddes, chp. 2. Bhattacherjee chps. 3, 4 and 5. Halperin and Heath, Chapter 5
4 Hypotheses, variables, Operationalization and Measurement Gerring, chs. 4, 5 and 7 Bhattacherjee chp. 2.
5 Qualitative and quantitative studies Vanderstoep and Johnston chp. 7. Collier, David, Jason Seawright, and Henry Brady. 2003. Qualitative versus Quantitative: What Might This Distinction Mean? Qualitative Methods. 1(1): 4-8. Mahoney, J. and G. Goertz. 2006. A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research. Political Analysis 14: 227-49.
6 Case study designs Gerring, John (2004). What Is a Case Study and What Is It Good For? American Political Science Review. 98(2): 341-54. Seawright, Jason and Gerring, John (2008). Case Selection Techniques in Case Study Research: A Menu of Qualitative and Quantitative Options. Political Research Quarterly. 61(2): 294-308. Geddes, ch. 4 Bennett, Andrew and Colin Elman (2007). Case Study Methods in the International Relations Subfield. Comparative Political Studies 40(2): 170-95.
7 Historical analysis Gray et al., chp 11. Thies, Cameron (2002). A Pragmatic Guide to Qualitative Historical Analysis in the Study of International Relations. International Studies Perspectives, 3(4), 351-372.
8 Ethnography and participant observation Wedeen, Lisa. “Reflections on Ethnographic Work in Political Science.” Annual Review of Political Science 13 (2010), pp. 255–272. Halperin and Heath, Chapter 12. Allina-Pisano, Jessica. Chapter 3 In Schatz, Edward, ed. Political Ethnography: What Immersion Contributes to the Study of Power. Pachirat, Timothy. Chapter 6, In Schatz, Edward, ed. Political Ethnography: What Immersion Contributes to the Study of Power.
9 Interviews Mosley, Layna, Introduction, Chapters 1, 2, 1. Halperin and Heath, chp. 11. Leech, Beth (2002). Asking Questions: Techniques for Semistructured Interviews. PS: Political Science & Politics, 35(4): 665-668. Berry, Jeffrey (2002). Validity and Reliability Issues In Elite Interviewing. PS: Political Science & Politics, 35(4): 679-682.
10 Content Analysis and Discourse analysis Weeden, Lisa. 2010. Reflections on Ethnographic Work in Political Science. Annual Review of Political Science 13: 255-72. Grimmer Justin and Brandon M. Stewart. 2013. Text as Data: The Promise and Pitfalls of Automatic Content Analysis Methods for Political Texts. Political Analysis 21(3):267-297. Vanderstoep and Johnston chp. 9 Fairclough, Norman and Isabela Ietcu Fairclough. Political Discourse Analysis. New York: Routledge (2012).
11 Survey Research Halperin and Heath, chp. 10. Bhattacherjee chp. 9. Smith, Tom W. and Frederick D. Weil (1990) Finding public opinion data: A guide to sources. Public Opinion Quarterly 54(4): 609-626.
12 Controlled Experiments Bhattacherjee chp. 10. McDermott, Rose. 2002. Experimental Methods in Political Science. Annual Review of Political Science 5: 31-61. Mintz, Alex, Yi Yang, and Rose McDermott. 2011. Experimental Approaches to International Relations. International Studies Quarterly 55(2): 493-501.
13 Presenting research findings and ethical problems Vanderstoep and Johnston chp. 14. Bien et al. (2014) Handbook of writing skills. Bhattacherjee chp. 16. Woliver, Laura (2002). Ethical Dilemmas in Personal Interviewing. PS: Political Science & Politics, 35(4), 677-678.
14 Presentations
15 Presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Lee, Richard E. Ve I. Wallerstein (eds.), Overcoming the Two Cultures: Science vs. the humanities in the modern world-system (FERNAND BRAUDEL CENTER SERIES), Paradigm Publishers, 2004.

Gulbenkian Commission, Open the Social Sciences, Stanford UP, 1996.

Neuman, W. Lawrence, Social Research Methods, Pearson, 2014.

Braudel, Fernand, On History, University of Chicago Press, 1980.

Şatana, Nil S., “Uluslararası İlişkilerde Bilimsellik, Metodoloji ve Yöntem”, Uluslararası İlişkiler, Cilt 12, Sayı 46, s. 11-33.

Claudia Aradau and Jef Huysmans, "Critical methods in International Relations: The politics of techniques, devices and acts", European Journal of International Relations published online 30 May 2013.

Wallerstein, I., The End of the World As We Know It: Social Science for the Twenty-First Century, University of Minnesota Press, 2001.

Bora, Tanıl, Semih Sökmen ve İ. Kaya Şahin (der.), Sosyal Bilimleri Yeniden Düşünmek: Yeni Bir Kavrayışa Doğru, Metis, 2013.

Uzun, Ali, A Scientometric Profile of Social Sciences Research in Turkey, Intl. Inform. & Libr. Rev. (1998), 30, 169-184.

Eco, Umberto, How to Write a Thesis, MIT Press, 2015.

Becker, Howard, Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article, University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Suggested Readings/Materials

King, Gary, Robert O. Keohane ve Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research, Princeton UP, 1994.

Brady, Henry E. Ve David Collier, Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards, Rowman and Littlefield, 2010.

Della Porta, Donatella, ve Michael Keating (der.), Approaches and Methodologies in the Social Sciences: A Pluralist Perspective, Cambridge UP, 2008.

Anderson, Benedict, A Life Beyond Boundaries: A Memoir, Verso, 2016.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
12
10
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
12
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
    Total
230

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest