PSIR 603 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Political Theory
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 603
Fall
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives This core course has two major objectives: (1) to introduce doctoral students to the fundamental questions and core concepts of political theory and (2) to explore the philosophical debates underlying political studies.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to discuss core concepts and ideas in political theory from a variety of angles
  • to interpret ethical and epistemological assumptions of various perspectives in political theory
  • to assess political phenomena and problems from a critical perspective
  • to evaluate historical and contemporary issues in light of the possibilities offered by theoretical research
  • to make scholarly contributions to political theory, political science and international relations
  • to participate in academic debate through seminar presentations and class discussion
  • to apply political theory to contemporary public debates
Course Content This course is specifically designed for doctoral candidates in the Ph.D. programme and constitutes the core course in the field of political theory. The main purpose of the course is to assist students in preparing for their comprehensive examinations in the subfield. We will focus on exploring key texts within modern and contemporary political theory which are considered particularly influential and controversial.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Contemporary Debates: What is Democracy? • Norberto Bobbio, “The Future of Democracy” in The Future of Democracy (Polity, 1991), 23-42. • Jürgen Habermas, “A Paradoxical Union of Contradictory Principles?” Political Theory 29 (6) (2001): 766-781. • Sheldon Wolin, “Fugitive Democracy” in Fugitive Democracy and Other Essays, (Princeton University Press, 2016), 100-113. • Chantal Mouffe, “For an Agonistic Model of Democracy” in The Democratic Paradox (Verso, 2000), 80-106.
3 Contemporary Debates: Democracy and Populism • Claude Lefort, “The Question of Democracy” in Democracy and Political Theory (Polity Press, 1988), 9-20. • Margaret Canovan, “Trust the People: Populism and the Two Faces of Democracy”, Political Studies XLVII (1999): 2-16. • Jan-Werner Müller, What is Populism? (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), 1-74.
4 Contemporary Debates: Constitutional Patriotism • Jan-Werner Müller, “On the Origins of Constitutional Patriotism” Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2006): 278-296. • Jan-Werner Müller, “A Brief History of Constitutional Patriotism” in Constitutional Patriotism (Princeton, 2007), 15-44.
5 Paper submission I
6 The Priority of Liberty • Benjamin Constant, “The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with that of the Moderns”, Constant: Political Writings (Cambridge University Press, 1988). • Judith Shklar, “Liberalism of Fear”, Political Thought and Political Thinkers (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1998).
7 Conceptions of Liberty Isaiah Berlin, “Two Concepts of Liberty”, Four Essays on Liberty (Oxford University Press, 1969).
8 Paper submission II
9 Republican Anxieties: Unity and People’s Sovereignty • Rousseau, Social Contract, Books (Selections from Book I, II and IV). • Recommended Reading: Nicholas Dent, Rousseau (Routledge, 2005).
10 Republican Anxieties: Plurality and Individual Rights • The Federalist Papers, Hamilton, 1, 6, 9, 23, 78; Madison, 10, 14, 39, 45-48, 51, 62-63. • Recommended Reading: Iain Hampsher-Monk, “Publius: The Federalist” A History of Modern Political Thought (Blackwell, 1992), 197-260.
11 Paper submission III
12 Democracy and Its Virtues Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. One, Part I, Chp. 2-4, 6-8.
13 Democracy and Public Life Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. One, Part II, Chp. 1-4, 6-9.
14 Democracy and Its Paradoxes Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. Two, Part I, Chp. 1-2, 8; Part II, Chp. 1-2, 4-5, 7-8, 10-11, 13-14; Part III, Chp. 1, 17-19, 21; Part IV, Chp. 1-2, 6-8.
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Stated above.

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
30
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
20
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
80
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
20
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
8
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
18
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
23
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest