PSIR 631 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
International Relations Theories
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 631
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To examine different theoretical approaches in the field of international relations and to understand and interpret contemporary theoretical debates.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Can explain the goal and importance of theory and theoretical researches.
  • Can explain the main assumptions, problematics, epistemological, ontological and methodological foundations and their solutions of those problematics with examples
  • Can compare and analyze different theories in regard to the issues mentioned in article two.
  • Can use theories of international relations to analyze and explain historical and contemporary events and problems.
  • Can comment on the future of international relations and emerging trends in the framework of discussed theoretical approaches.
Course Content This graduate seminar surveys the main theoretical and analytical approaches encountered in the study of international relations.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction – syllabus presentation and explanation. Syllabus and documents containing rules for the undertaking and evaluation of students’ individual analytical work
2 What is Theory? Bull, Hedley. 1966. “International Theory: The Case for a Classical Approach.” World Politics 18: 361-77. Chernoff, Fred. 2007. Theory and Metatheory in International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 3 Waltz, Kenneth. 1979. Theory of International Politics, Chapter 1
3 Realism: Classical and Structural E. H. Carr, The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939, 2nd ed. (1945), chaps. 1-6. Kenneth N. Waltz, Theory of International Politics (1979), chaps. 1, 4-6. John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (2001), chaps. 1-2, 9-10.
4 Neoclassical Realism Charles L. Glaser, "The Security Dilemma Revisited," World Politics (October 1997): 171-201. Gideon Rose, "Neoclassical Realism and Foreign Policy," World Politics (October 1998): 144-172.
5 First Drafts Due Discussion of students' drafts
6 Liberal International Relations Theory Robert O. Keohane, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (1984), chaps. 1-7. Andrew Moravcsik, "Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics" International Organization 51 (Fall 1997): 513-553. Keohane, Robert O. and Lisa L. Martin. 1995. “The Promise of Institutionalist Theory.” International Security 20(1): 39-51.
7 Democratic Peace Theory Michael Doyle, "Kant, Liberal Legacies, and Foreign Affairs, Part I," Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (Summer 1983): 205-235. John Owen, "How Liberalism Produces Democratic Peace," International Security 19 (Fall 1994): 87-125. Russett, Bruce M., and John R. Oneal. 2001. Triangulating Peace: Democracy, Interdependence and International Organizations. New York: W. W. Norton
8 Constructivism: Theoretical Foundations Alex Wendt, “Anarchy is what states make of it:the social construction of power politics,” International Organization, Vol. 46 (1992): 391‐425; Alex Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 92‐192; Ian Hurd, “Legitimacy and Authority in International Politics,” International Organization¸ Vol. 53 (1999): 379‐408
9 Second drafts due Discussion of students’ drafts
10 Constructivism: Theory in Practice Alastair Johnston, “Thinking About Strategic Culture,” International Security, Vol. 19 (1995): 32‐64; Alex Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 246‐312; Barry Buzan,Ole Waever, and Jaap de Wilde, Security: A New Framework for Analysis (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rieder, 1998), 1‐49; Nina Tannenwald, “The Nuclear Taboo: The United States and the Normative Basis of Nuclear Non‐use,” International Organization, Vol. 53 (1999): 433‐46; Michael Barnett and Raymond Duvall, “Power in International Politics,” International Organization, Vol. 59 (2005): 39‐75;
11 Rationalism: A Unifying Approach to International Relations? David Lake and Robert Powell, “International Relations: a Strategic Choice Approach” in Lake and Powell, editors, Strategic Choice and International Relations(Princeton,NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999), 3‐38; James D. Morrow, “The Strategic Setting of Choices: Signaling, Commitment, and Negotiation in International Politics,” in Lake and Powell, editors, Strategic Choice and International Relations (Princeton,NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999), 77‐114; Duncan Snidal, “Rational Choice and IR,” in Carlsnaes, Risse, and Simmons, editors,Handbook of International Relations (London: Sage, 2002), 73‐94; James Fearon, “Rationalist Explanations for War,” International Organization, Vol. 49 (1995): 379‐414; Stephen Walt, “Rigor or Rigor Mortis? Rational Choice and Security Studies,” International Security, Vol. 23 1999: 5‐48.
12 The English School Cornelia Navari (eds.).Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan. 2009 Barry Buzan. From International to World Society?: English School Theory and the Social Structure of Globalisation. Cambridge UP. 2004.
13 Post-Positivism: From the Margins to the Mainstream? Ido Oren, Our Enemies and US: America's Rivalries and the Making of Political Science (2002), intro., chap. 4. Richard K. Ashley, "The Poverty of Neorealism," International Organization 38 (Spring 1984): 225-286. Jean Bethke Elshtain, Women and War (1995), chaps. 5-7. J. Ann Tickner, "What is Your Research Program? Some Feminist answers to International Relations Methodological Questions," International Studies Quarterly 49 (March 2005): 1-21.
14 Review
15 Papers due
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks List of readings are provided above.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
25
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
75
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
10
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
65
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
253

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest