PSIR 633 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Ethics and International Relations
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 633
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The students who succeeded in this course will be able to classify competing theories in relation to ethics in international relations
  • identify the motivations of actors formulating foreign policy on ethical grounds
  • discuss ethical issues in contemporary international politics by using theoretical prspectives
  • explain the major problems in multilateral humanitarian interventions
  • analyze the changes in war crimes in cases of global terrorism
  • compare the arguments pro and against international obligation of wealthy states to eliminate global poverty
Course Content This advanced course examines the role of morality in international relations. The course starts with an overview of different theoretical perspectives concerning ethics in international relations, it proceeds to consider the ethical dimen¬sions of more specific international issues such as the use of force, global human rights, and global justice. Students will be familiarized by contemporary cases as well.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Morality in IR 1- Hutchings, Kimberly. “What is Global Ethics?” Global Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010, pp. 1-27 2- Hedley Bull, The Anarchical Society, ch. 1-2, pp. 3-52
3 Realism, Morality and International Law 1- Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince (entire), The Discourses, Book II, ch. 1, 9-13 2- Hans Morgenthau, Politics Among Nations (5th edition), ch. 1, pp. 3-15 3- Hutchings, Kimberly. “Rationalist Ethics Theories” Global Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010, pp. 28-53.
4 Liberal Schools of Thought and Ethics I 1- Immanuel Kant, “Idea for a Universal History With a Cosmopolitan Intent” and “Perpetual Peace” in Perpetual Peace and Other Essays, pp. 29-40, 107-143 2- Walter Laqueur and Barry Rubin, eds., The Human Rights Reader, pp. 62-75, 82-94
5 Liberal Schools of Thought and Ethics II 1- Stanley Hoffmann, “The Crisis of International Liberalism,” World Disorders, Ch. 5 2- Stanley Hoffmann, Janus and Minerva, ch. 3-4, pp. 52-81 3- Chris Brown. International Relations Theory: New Normative Approaches. Columbia University Press, 1993, Chs. 2-3
6 Ethics of War 1- Albert Camus, “The Just Assassins,” in Caligula and Three Other Plays, pp. 233-302 2- Sanford Levinson, “Responsibility for Crimes of War”
7 Ethics and Unilateral Use of Force 1- Stanley Hoffmann, Duties Beyond Borders, ch. 1, pp. 1-43 2- Hedley Bull, The Anarchical Society, ch. 3-4, pp. 53-98 3- Joseph Nye, “Ethics and Intervention,” in Linda Miller and Michael Smith, eds., Ideas and Ideals, ch. 9, pp. 127-143
8 Ethics and Multilateral Use of Force 1- James Childress, “Just War Criteria,” in Moral Responsibility in Conflicts, ch. 3, pp. 63-94 2- Bryan Hehir, “The Just War in a Post-Cold War World,” Journal of Religious Ethics (Fall 1992), pp. 237-257 3- David Luban, “Just War and Human Rights” 4- Michael Walzer, “The Moral Standing of States: A Response to Four Critics” 5- Bryan Hehir, “The Just-War Ethic Revisited,” in Linda Miller and Michael Smith, eds., Ideas and Ideals, ch. 10, pp. 144-161 6- Stanley Hoffmann, The Ethics and Politics of Humanitarian Intervention, pp:97-116
9 Ethical Concerns in the Age of Global Terrorism 1- Robert K Fullinwider, "Terrorism, Innocence, and War." War after September 11. Ed. Verna V. Gehring. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. 21-36. 2- David Hendrickson and Robert W. Tucker, "Revisions in Need of Revising: What Went Wrong in the Iraq War," Survival (Summer 2005), pp. 7-31 3- John Kelsay, “Just War and Jihad” The Study of Comparative Ethics, pp. 227-238
10 Nuclear Proliferation 1- Joseph Nye, Nuclear Ethics, ch. 3-5 2- Steven Lee, “Nuclear Proliferation and Nuclear Entitlement,” Ethics and International Affairs (1995), pp. 101-131 3- Thomas Doyle, “Reviving Nuclear Ethics”, Ethics and International Affairs, (Fall, 2010) pp. 287-308.
11 International Regime of Human Rights? 1- Maurice Cranston, “Are There Any Human Rights?” Daedalus (Fall 1983), pp. 1-17 2- Stanley Hoffmann, “Reaching for the Most Difficult: Human Rights as a Foreign Policy Goal” Vol. 112, No. 4, (Fall 1983) pp: 19-49. 3- Jack Goldsmith and Stephen Krasner, “The Limits of Idealism,” Daedalus (Winter 2003), pp. 17-63
12 International Ethics and Economic Development 1- Paul Harris and Patricia Siplon, “International Obligation and Human Health,” Ethics and International Affairs, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 29-52 2- Ethan Kapstein, “Models of International Economic Justice,” Ethics and Interna¬tional Affairs 18,2 (2004), pp. 79-92 3- Nancy Kokaz, “Poverty and Global Justice,” Ethics and International Affairs 21, 3 (2007), pp. 317-336
13 Migration and refugees 1- Humphrey, Michael. "Refugees: An Endangered Species?" Journal of Sociology 39.1 (2003): 31-43. 2- Hindess, Barry. "Responsibility for Others in the Modern System of States." Journal of Sociology 39.1 (2003): 23-30.
14 Concluding Remarks Hutchings, Kimberly. “Global Ethics in a Glocal Context,” Global Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010, pp. 197-221
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
75
Presentation / Jury
1
85
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
250

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest