PSIR 634 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
International Political Economy
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 634
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The study of international political economy analyzes the tensions that exist between states and markets. In an effort to understand these tensions the main theoretical IPE approaches will be analyzed in detail along with different models of economic development that have their origins in these theoretical approaches.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Identify tensions that exist between states and markets
  • Compare and contrast the three main theories of IPE along with other critical approaches
  • Compare free trade with protectionism
  • Critique the current international system and its effects on developing states
  • Identify how international finance affects states and other actors
  • Analyze the balance of payments of states and how different investments, currency changes and privatization may affect the current and capital accounts
  • Identify the different models of economic development employed by developing states
Course Content This course provides an introduction to International Political Economy (IPE); the basic theories surrounding this inter-disciplinary field and issues such as globalization and related concepts and conflicts. Students will be introduced to the mainstream theories of IPE along with critical perspectives, the topics of international money and finance, trade and transnational corporations (TNCs), the issues of economic development and North-South relations.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 What is International Political Economy? Thomas Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, Chapter 1 Susan Strange, States and Markets: An Introduction to International Political Economy Pietra Rivoli, The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An Economist Examines Markets, Power and Politics of World Trade Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Economic Revolution”, The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times, and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers
2 Mercantilism and Economic Nationalism Jacob Viner, “Power versus Plenty as Objectives of Foreign Policy in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries,” World Politics 1 (October 1948), pp. 1-29 Eric Helleiner, “Economic Nationalism as a Challenge to Economic Liberalism? Lessons From the 19th Century,” International Studies Quarterly (2002), 46, pp. 307-329 Robert Reich, The Work of NationsAlexander Hamilton, “Report on Manufactures” Friedrich List, “The National System of Political Economy” Ha-Joon Chang, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism
3 Mercantilism and Economic Nationalism Jacob Viner, “Power versus Plenty as Objectives of Foreign Policy in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries,” World Politics 1 (October 1948), pp. 1-29 Eric Helleiner, “Economic Nationalism as a Challenge to Economic Liberalism? Lessons From the 19th Century,” International Studies Quarterly (2002), 46, pp. 307-329 Robert Reich, The Work of NationsAlexander Hamilton, “Report on Manufactures” Friedrich List, “The National System of Political Economy” Ha-Joon Chang, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism
4 The Liberal IPE Perspective Thomas Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree Friedrich A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom Adam Smith, The Invisible Hand, Penguin Books Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents Joseph Stiglitz, Making Globalization Work Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw, The Commanding Heights Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Wonderful World of Adam Smith” Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Gloomy Presentiments of Parson Malthus and David Ricardo” Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Heresies of John Maynard Keynes” Jagdish Bhagwati, In Defense of Globalization
5 The Liberal IPE Perspective Thomas Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree Friedrich A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom Adam Smith, The Invisible Hand, Penguin Books Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents Joseph Stiglitz, Making Globalization Work Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw, The Commanding Heights Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Wonderful World of Adam Smith” Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Gloomy Presentiments of Parson Malthus and David Ricardo” Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Heresies of John Maynard Keynes” Jagdish Bhagwati, In Defense of Globalization
6 Marxism / Structuralism Benjamin Barber, Jihad vs. McWorld V.I. Lenin, Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism Karl Marx, Capital Georg Lukacs, Class Consciousness George Orwell, Animal Farm Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Inexorable System of Karl Marx” Antonio Gramsci, Selections from the Prison Notebooks Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis”, Comparative Studies in Society and History, September 1974
7 Marxism / Structuralism Benjamin Barber, Jihad vs. McWorld V.I. Lenin, Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism Karl Marx, Capital Georg Lukacs, Class Consciousness George Orwell, Animal Farm Robert L. Heilbroner, “The Inexorable System of Karl Marx” Antonio Gramsci, Selections from the Prison Notebooks Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis”, Comparative Studies in Society and History, September 1974
8 Critical Perspectives on IPE and the Environment Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action E.F. Schumacher, Small is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered J. Ann Tickner, “Gendering World Politics” Kevin Danaher et al., Building the Green Economy: Success Stories from the Grassroots Cynthia Enloe, Bananas, Beaches and Bases Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild, Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy Alexander Wendt, “Anarchy is What States Make of It: The Social Construction of Power Politics,” International Organization, 46 (Spring 1992), pp. 391-425 Gita Sen, “Gender, Markets and States: A Selective Review and Research Agenda”, World Development, 24, no. 5 (1996) Thomas L. Friedman, Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How it Can Renew America Al Gore, Our Choice Penny Griffin, “Refashioning IPE: What and how gender analysis teaches international (global) political economy”, Review of International Political Economy 14:4, October 2007: 719-736 V. Spike Peterson, “How (the Meaning of) Gender Matters in Political Economy”, New Political Economy, Vo. 10, No. 4, December 2005
9 International Trade Ralph Nader, “Introduction: Free Trade and the Introduction of Democracy” Gary Hufbauer, “World Trade After Seattle”
10 International Finance Barry Eichengreen, Chapter 4: The Bretton Woods System, pp. 93-135 (in course pack) Paul Krugman, “Dutch Tulips and Emerging Markets” Susan George, “The Debt Boomerang” Susan George, “How Much is $1 Trillion?” Dani Rodrik, “Goodbye Washington Consensus, Hello Washington Confusion?” Journal of Economic Literature, XLIV (December 2006), pp. 973-987 Robert Wade, “The First-World Debt Crisis of 2007-2010 in Global Perspective”, Challenge, July-August 2008, pp. 23-54 Suggested Readings: Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents Kevin Danaher, 50 Years is Enough Benjamin Cohen, The Geography of Money Barry Eichengreen, Globalizing Capital: A History of the International Monetary System Charles Kindleberger, Manias, Panics and Crashes Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents Peter L. Bernstein, Against the Gods Kevin Danaher, 50 Years is Enough Susan George and Fabrizio Sabelli, Faith and Credit: The World Bank’s Secular Empire M. A. Thomas, “Getting Debt Relief Right” Jeffrey Sachs, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities of Our Time
11 Economic Development Ali H. Bayar, “The Developmental State and Economic Policy in Turkey”, Third World Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4, pp. 773-785, 1996 (in Course Pack) Joseph Wong, “The Adaptive Developmental State in East Asia”, Journal of East Asia Studies 4 (2004), 345-362 (in Course Pack) Paul Krugman, “The Myth of Asia’s Miracle,” Foreign Affairs 73.6 Nov/Dec 1994 (in Course Pack) Suggested Readings: Walt Whitman Rostow, The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto, Cambridge University Pres, 1971 Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis,” Comparative Studies in Society and History, Volume 16, Issue 4 (Sep. 1974), pp. 387-415 (in Course Pack) Christobal Kay, “Why East Asia Overtook Latin America: Agrarian Reform, Industrialization and Development,” Third World Quarterly, Vol. 23, No 6, pp. 1073-1102, 2002 (in Course Pack) Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the Poor: Micro-Lending and the Battle Against World Poverty Hernando de Soto, The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else Tina Rosenberg, “That Taint of the Greased Palm”, New York Times Magazine (in course pack) Ha-Joon Chang, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism Jeffrey D. Sachs, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities of Our Time
12 Economic Development Ali H. Bayar, “The Developmental State and Economic Policy in Turkey”, Third World Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4, pp. 773-785, 1996 (in Course Pack) Joseph Wong, “The Adaptive Developmental State in East Asia”, Journal of East Asia Studies 4 (2004), 345-362 (in Course Pack) Paul Krugman, “The Myth of Asia’s Miracle,” Foreign Affairs 73.6 Nov/Dec 1994 (in Course Pack) Suggested Readings: Walt Whitman Rostow, The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto, Cambridge University Pres, 1971 Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis,” Comparative Studies in Society and History, Volume 16, Issue 4 (Sep. 1974), pp. 387-415 (in Course Pack) Christobal Kay, “Why East Asia Overtook Latin America: Agrarian Reform, Industrialization and Development,” Third World Quarterly, Vol. 23, No 6, pp. 1073-1102, 2002 (in Course Pack) Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the Poor: Micro-Lending and the Battle Against World Poverty Hernando de Soto, The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else Tina Rosenberg, “That Taint of the Greased Palm”, New York Times Magazine (in course pack) Ha-Joon Chang, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism Jeffrey D. Sachs, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities of Our Time
13 Presentations
14 Presentations
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Scholarly books, book chapters, articles power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials Recommended readings (further published works and scholarship on European diplomatic and military history)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
2
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
1
60
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
38
Final Exam
    Total
256

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest