PSIR 635 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Foreign Policy Analysis
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 635
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The main objective of this advanced course is to critically analyze various theoretical perspectives which focus on foreign policy formulation and implementation processes, actors that play a role in these processes and foreign policy instruments.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • classify theories in relation to foreign policy
  • identify the motivations of actors formulating foreign policy
  • discuss main objectives of states in the international arena
  • explain the steps of rational model
  • identify the actors who play a role in foreign policy formulation process from a Liberal perspective
Course Content This advanced course examines the capacity of states to meet their economic and political foreign policy goals. Furthermore, it critically evaluates the domestic and international actors and factors in the making and implementation of foreign policy. The course focuses on political, economic, institutional, social and psychological/ psychoanalytical dimensions of foreign policy.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 The field of foreign policy analysis 1) Valerie M. Hudson, "Foreign Policy Analysis: Actor-Specific Theory and the Ground of International Relations," Foreign Policy Analysis 1,1 (2005): 1-30. International System level 2) Alexander E. Wendt, "The agent-structure problem in international relations theory." International Organization 41 (Summer 1987):335-70. 3)Singer, J.D. (1961) The level-of-analysis problem in international politics, World Politics 14: 77-92.
3 Realist FPA State level Gideon, Rose. (October 1998) Neoclassical Realism and Theories of Foreign Policy World Politics 51 144-72. Colin Elman. (Autumn 1996) Why Not Neorealist Theories of Foreign Policy? Security Studies 6,1 7-53.
4 Bureaucratic Politics/ Organizational Processes Model Allison, Graham T.. (September 1969) Conceptual Models and the Cuban Missile Crisis American Political Science Review 63, 3 689-718. Rhodes, Edward (October 1994) Do Bureaucratic Politics Matter? Some Disconfirming Findings from the Case of the U.S. Navy World Politics 47 1-41. Welch, D. (1992) The organizational process and bureaucratic politics paradigm International Security 17: 112-146.
5 Societal Level Public Opinion Holsti, Ole R. (December 1992), Public Opinion and Foreign Policy International Studies Quarterly, 36, 4 439-466. Chan, Steve, and William Safran.( 2006) Public Opinion as a Constraint against War: Democracies’ Responses to Operation Iraqi Freedom, Foreign Policy Analysis 2: 137–156.
6 Societal Level Interest Groups International Studies Review special issue on "Leaders, Groups, and Coalitions: Understanding the People and Processes in Foreign Policy Making," (3, 2 Summer 2001). Narizny, Kevin “Both Guns and Butter, or Neither: Class Interests in the Political Economy of Rearmament,” American Political Science Review, 97, 2 (May 2003), 203-220
7 Media and FPA Gilboa, Eytan. (1999) Global Television News and Foreign Policy: Debating the CNN Effect International Studies Perspectives 6: 325-341. Kim, Jang Hyun, Tuo-Yu Su, and Junhao Hong. (2007) The Influence of Geopolitics and Foreign Policy on the U.S. and Canadian Media: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Sudan’s Darfur Conflict Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics 12: 87-95.
8 Small Groups Hermann, Margaret G. (Summer 2001) How Decision Units Shape Foreign Policy: A Theoretical Framework International Studies Review 3, 2 47-82. Philip E. Tetlock et. al., (September 1992) Assessing Political Group Dynamics: A Test of the Groupthink Model Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63 403-425.
9 Social pressures and polarization Irving L. Janis, Groupthink: Psychological Studies of Policy Decisions and Fiascoes, Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1982, chs. 1-2. Eric K. Stern, "Probing the Plausibility of Newgroup Syndrome: Kennedy and the Bay of Pigs," in Paul 't Hart, Eric K. Stern, and Bengt Sundelius, Beyond Groupthink: Political Group Dynamics and Foreign Policy-Making, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 1997, ch. 6. Paul A. Kowert, Groupthink or Deadlock: When Do Leaders Learn from their Advisors? Albany: State University of New York Press 2002, chs. 1-2, 7.
10 Leadership Jervis, Robert “How Decision-Makers Learn from History” in Jervis, Perception and Misperception in International Politics (1976), chapter 6. Levy, Jack “Learning and Foreign Policy: Sweeping a Conceptual Minefield,” International Organization 48 (Spring 1994), 279-312.
11 National Identity, Culture and Norms Bar-Tal, Daniel, and Dikla Antebi. (1992) Beliefs About Negative Intentions of the World: A Study of the Israeli Siege Mentality Political Psychology 13: 633-645. Hudson, Valerie M. (1999) Cultural Expectations of One's Own and Other Nations' Foreign Policy Action Templates Political Psychology 20: 767-801. Miyagi, Yukiko. (2009) Foreign Policy Making Under Koizumi: Norms and Japan’s Role in the 2003 Iraq War Foreign Policy Analysis 5: 349–366. Warner, Carolyn M. and Stephen G. Walker (January 2011) Thinking about the Role of Religion in Foreign Policy: A Framework for Analysis Foreign Policy Analysis 7, 1 113-135.
12 Critical Approaches to Foreign Policy Weber, Cynthia. (May 2010) After Liberalism Millennium ‐ Journal of International Studies 38 (3), pg. 553‐560. Price, Richard. (2008) Moral Limit and possibility in world politics, pp: 1-53
13 Future of the Discipline Haukkala, Hiski. (2012) Timing is Everything: The Time, Space, and Strategies for Scholarly Analysis in the Making of Foreign Policy International Studies Perspectives 1‐13. Kaarbo, J. (2003) Foreign policy analysis in the twenty-first century: Back to comparison, forward to identity and ideas, International Studies Review 5: 156-163.
14 Concluding Remarks
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
1
50
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
100
Presentation / Jury
1
60
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
250

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest