PSIR 637 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
New Approaches and Concepts in International Relations
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 637
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide students with a survey of the emerging theories, methods, and research programs in the field of International Relations.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Develop a good grasp of emerging research programs in IR literature.
  • Understand methodological and theoretical debates in international relations.
  • Critically analyze empirical and theoretical works in IR.
  • Discuss contemporary topics and approaches in IR literature.
Course Content This Course will provide a survey of the emerging IR literature and new methodological approaches in the field.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction – syllabus presentation and explanation. Syllabus and documents containing rules for the undertaking and evaluation of students’ individual analytical work
2 New Theoretical Approaches in International Relations - I: Evolutionary Theory The social evolution of international politics. Shiping Tang. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2013
3 New Theoretical Approaches in International Relations - II: Social Network Theory Carrington, Peter J., John Scott, and Stanley Wasserman, eds. 2005. Models and Methods in Social Network Analysis. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. “Network Analysis for International Relations”. Emilie M. Hafner-Burtona, Miles Kahlera and Alexander H. Montgomery. International Organization, V.63:3, p.559-592, July 2009.
4 New Theoretical Approaches in International Relations - III: The Practice Turn Adler, Emanuel and Vincent Pouliot, eds. 2012. International Practices. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
5 First Drafts Due Discussion of Students' Drafts
6 New Methods in International Relations - I: Dealing with Big Data Cukier, C and Mayer-Schoenberger, V (2013) 'Rise of Big Data: How it's Changing the Way We Think about the World'. Foreign Affairs, 98. Virtual Special Issue: Big Data in Political Science. Political Analysis. (http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/polana/virtualissue4.html
7 New Methods in International Relations - II: Experimental Methods in IR “New Directions for Experimental Work in International Relations”. Rose McDermott. ISQ, V.55:2, p. 503-520. 2011. Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science. Cambridge University Press. 2011.
8 New Methods in International Relations - III: Exploring the Neurobiology of Decision Making “The Study of International Politics in the Neurobiological Revolution: A Review of Leadership and Political Violence”. Rose McDermott and Peter Hatemi. Millennium - Journal of International Studies. September 2014 vol. 43 no. 1 92-123. J.H. Fowler and D. Schreiber, ‘Biology, Politics, and the Emerging Science of Human Nature’, Science 322, no. 5903 (2008): 912–14 Peter K. Hatemi and Rose McDermott, ‘A Neurobiological Approach to Foreign Policy Analysis: Identifying Individual Differences in Political Violence’, Foreign Policy Analysis 8, no. 2 (2012): 111–29. Anthony C. Lopez, Rose McDermott and Michael Bang Petersen, ‘States in Mind: Evolution, Coalitional Psychology, and International Politics’, International Security 36, no. 2 (2011): 48–83.
9 Second Drafts Due Discussion of students’ drafts
10 New Topics in International Relations - I: Cyberspace Cyberspace and International Relations Theory, Prospects and Challenges. Kremer, Jan-Frederik, Müller, Benedikt (eds.). Springer. 2014.
11 New Topics in International Relations - II: Emotions Mercer, Jonathan. 2006. “Human Nature and the First Image: Emotion in International Politics”. Journal of International Relations and Development 9:288-303. Panksepp, Jaak, and Lucy. Biven. 2012. The Archaeology of Mind : Neuroevolutionary Origins of Human Emotions. New York: W. W Norton. Hafner-Burton, Emilie M., D. Alex Hughes, and David G. Victor. 2013. “The Cognitive Revolution and the Political Psychology of Elite Decision Making”. Perspectives on Politics 11:368-86. Marcus, George E. 2012. Political Psychology: Neuroscience, Genetics and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press.
12 New Topics in International Relations - III: Information Warfare Taddeo, Mariarosaria (2012). Information Warfare: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):105-120. Journal of Information Warfare. Additional Readings by the instructor.
13 The Future of International Relations
14 Review
15 Papers Due
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks A list of readings for each week are provided above.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
25
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
75
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
10
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
65
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
253

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest