Syllabus - PhD in Political Science and International Relations | İzmir University of Economics

GRADUATE SCHOOL

PhD in Political Science and International Relations

PSIR 641 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Social Movements
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 641
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives By the end of this course, students will understand the causes, stages, forms and outcomes of social movements.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define core concepts related to social movements.
  • discuss the main theories of social movements.
  • distinguish the political, demographic, cultural, religious and economic reasons behind social movements.
  • explain why some movements succeed, why some fail.
  • discuss transnational social movements.
Course Description The course introduces students to social movements that take place in Turkey and other countries.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction – syllabus presentation and explanation. Introduction to the lecture and readings.
2 An overview of social movements Della Porta and Diani (2006) “Social Movements: An Introduction”, Chapter 1. Marx, Gary T., and James L. Wood. “Strands of Theory and Research in Collective Behavior.” Annual Review of Sociology, vol. 1, 1975, pp. 363–428.
3 Political structures and opportunities Sidney Tarrow (1998) “Power in Movement,” Chapters 4 and 5. Meyer, David S., and Debra C. Minkoff. “Conceptualizing Political Opportunity.” Social Forces, vol. 82, no. 4, 2004, pp. 1457–1492. Meyer, David S. “Protest and Political Opportunities.” Annual Review of Sociology, vol. 30, 2004, pp. 125–145.
4 Collective action problem Mancur Olson (1965) “Logic of Collective Action,” Intro and Chapter 1. Walsh, Edward J., and Rex H. Warland. “Social Movement Involvement in the Wake of a Nuclear Accident: Activists and Free Riders in the TMI Area.” American Sociological Review, vol. 48, no. 6, 1983, pp. 764–780.
5 Resource mobilization theory McCarthy, John D., and Mayer N. Zald. “Resource Mobilization and Social Movements: A Partial Theory.” American Journal of Sociology, vol. 82, no. 6, 1977, pp. 1212–1241. Della Porta and Diani (2006) “Social Movements: An Introduction,” Chapter 6. Sidney Tarrow (1998) “Power in Movement,” Chapter 3. Verta Taylor. 1989. “Social Movement Continuity: The Women’s Movement in Abeyance.” American Sociological Review 54 (Oct): 761-775.
6 Networks Della Porta and Diani (2006) “Social Movements: An Introduction,” Chapter 5 Sidney Tarrow (1998) “Power in Movement,” chapter 8. Klandermans, Bert, Jojanneke van der Toorn, et al. (2008). “Embeddedness and Identity: How Immigrants Turn Grievances into Action.” American Sociological Review 73: 992-1012.
7 Identities Della Porta and Diani (2006) “Social Movements: An Introduction,” Chapter 4. Polletta, Francesca and James M. Jasper. 2001. “Collective Identity and Social Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology 27:283-305. Polletta, F. (1998). “”It Was Like a Fever…” Narrative and Identity in Social Protest.” Social Problems 45(2): 137-159
8 Media’s role Roscigno, V. J. and W. F. Danaher (2001). “Media and Mobilization: The Case of Radio and Southern Textile Worker Insurgency, 1929 to 1934.” American Sociological Review 66(1): 21-48. Sidney Tarrow (1998) “Power in Movement,” Chapter 3. William Gamson and Andre Modigliani. 1989. “Media Discourse and Public Opinion on Nuclear power: A Constructionist Approach.” American Journal of Sociology 95: 1-37. Myers, Daniel J. and Beth Schaefer Caniglia (2004). “All the Rioting That’s Fit to Print: Selection Effects in National Newspaper Coverage of Civil Disorders, 1968-1969.” American Sociological Review 69(4): 519-543.
9 Social media Tremayne, Mark. "Anatomy of protest in the digital era: A network analysis of Twitter and Occupy Wall Street." Social Movement Studies 13.1 (2014): 110-126. Harlow, Summer, and Thomas J. Johnson. "The Arab spring| overthrowing the protest paradigm? How the New York Times, global voices and twitter covered the Egyptian revolution." International journal of Communication 5 (2011): 16. Earl, Jennifer, et al. "This protest will be tweeted: Twitter and protest policing during the Pittsburgh G20." Information, Communication & Society 16.4 (2013): 459-478. Segerberg, Alexandra, and W. Lance Bennett. "Social media and the organization of collective action: Using Twitter to explore the ecologies of two climate change protests." The Communication Review 14.3 (2011): 197-215.
10 Outcomes of social movements Giugni, Marco G. 1998. “Was It Worth the Effort? The Outcomes and Consequences of Social Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology 24: 371-393. Della Porta and Diani (2006) “Social Movements: An Introduction,” Chapter 9.
11 The Arab Spring Presentations Timeline of Revolts: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/mar/22/middle-east-protest-interactive-timeline Eric Goldstein, 2011. “A Middle Class Revolution,” http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/01/18/a_middle_class_revolution
12 Social movements in Turkey Presentations Arat, Y. 1994. Toward a democratic society: The women's movement in Turkey in the 1980s. Women’s Studies International Forum 17, no.2-3: 241-248. Baydar, Gülsüm and İvegen, Berfin. 2006. Territories, identities, and thresholds: The Saturday Mothers phenomenon in İstanbul. Signs 31, no.3: 689-715.
13 Transnational movements Sidney Tarrow (1998) “Power in Movement,” Chapter 11. Mara Loveman. “High-Risk Collective Action: Defending Human Rights in Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina.” American Journal of Sociology; 1998, 104, 2, Sept, 477-525. Boudreau, V. (1996). “Northern Theory, Southern Protest: Opportunity Structure Analysis in Cross-National Perspective.” Mobilization 1(2): 175-189. Smith, J. (2001). “Globalizing Resistance: The Battle of Seattle and the Future of Social Movements.” Mobilization 6(1): 1-19.
14 Review
15 Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Books (see above), power point presentations.

All course readings are available at the University Library and as open sources.

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
14
8
112
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Homework / Assignments
1
30
30
Presentation / Jury
1
5
5
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
0
Final Exam
1
28
28
    Total
223

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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