PSIR 641 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Social Movements
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 641
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives By the end of this course, students will understand the causes, stages, forms and outcomes of social movements.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students will be able to define core concepts related to social movements.
  • Students will be able to discuss the main theories of social movements.
  • Students will be able to distinguish the political, demographic, cultural, religious and economic reasons behind social movements.
  • Students will be able to discuss social movements in Turkey and in other countries.
  • Students will be able to discuss why some movements succeed, why some fail.
  • Students will be able to discuss transnational social movements.
Course Content The course introduces students to social movements that take place in Turkey and other countries.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction – syllabus presentation and explanation. Syllabus and documents containing rules for the undertaking and evaluation of students’ individual analytical work
2 What is a social movement? Staggenborg,Suzanne. 2012 Social Movements, Toronto: Oxford University Press, pp.1-9. Snow, David. 2004.“Social Movements as Challenges to Authority:Resistance to an Emerging Conceptual Hegemony.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 25:3 – 25.
3 Main theories John McCarthy and Mayer Zald. “Resource Mobilization and Social Movements: A Partial Theory” in Vincenzo Ruggiero and Nicola Montagna, eds., Social Movements: A Reader (London and New York: Routledge, 20 08), pp. 105-117. Staggenborg, Suzanne. 2012. Social Movements, pp.13-46. Tarrow, Sidney.1993. “Cycles of Collective Action: Between Moments of Madness and the Repertoire of Contention.” Social Science History Vol. 17 (2): 281 – 307.
4 Collective action problem Mancur Olson, “Logic of Collective Action” in Vincenzo Ruggiero and Nicola Montagna, eds., Social Movements: A Reader (London: Routledge, 2008), pp. 93-94.
5 Political structures Herbert Kitschelt, "Political Opportunity Structures and Political Protest: Antinuclear Movements in Four Democracies," British Journal of Political Science 16(1986): 57-85. Noonan, Rita “Women against the State: Political Opportunities and Collective Action Frames in Chile’s Transition to Democracy.” Sociological Forum. Edwin Amenta, Drew Halfmann, and Michael P. Young, "The Strategies and Contexts of Social Protest: Political Mediation and the Impact of the Townsend Movement in California," Mobilization 4 (1999):1-23.
6 Organizational Repertoires Charles Tilly, "Contentious Repertoires in Great Britain, 1758-1834," in Mark Traugott, ed., Repertoires and Cycles of Collective Action (1994). • Elisabeth Clemens, "Organizational Repertoires and Institutional Change: Women's Groups and the Transformation of U.S. Politics, 1890-1920," American Journal of Sociology 98 (1993): 755-798. Theda Skocpol, "Associations Without Members," American Prospect 45 (July-August 1999): 66-73.
7 Media’s role Juris, Jeffrey S. “The New Digital Media and Activist Networking within Anti- Corporate Globalization Movements.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Staggenborg, Suzanne. 2012. Social Movements, pp.48-52.
8 Cultural factors Williams, Rhys “Constructing the Public Good: Social Movements and Cultural Resources.” Social Problem. Bernstein, Mary “Celebration and Suppression: The Strategic Uses of Identity by the Lesbian and Gay Movement.” American Journal of Sociology. McAdam, Doug “Gender as Mediator of the Activist Experience: The Case of Freedom Summer.” American Journal of Sociology.
9 Religion and social movements Harris, Fredrick C. 1994. Something within: Religion as a mobilizer of African-American political activism. The Journal of Politics 56, no.1: 42-68. Kalaycıoğlu, Ersin. 2007. Religiosity and protest behaviour: The case of Turkey in comparative perspective. Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans 9, no.3: 275-291.
10 Impact of social movements Giugni, Marco G. 1998. “Was It Worth the Effort? The Outcomes and Consequences of Social Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology 24: 371-393.
11 The Arab Spring Timeline of Revolts: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/mar/22/middle-east-protest-interactive-timeline Eric Goldstein, 2011. “A Middle Class Revolution,” http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/01/18/a_middle_class_revolution
12 Social movements in Turkey Arat, Y. 1994. Toward a democratic society: The women's movement in Turkey in the 1980s. Women’s Studies International Forum 17, no.2-3: 241-248. Baydar, Gülsüm and İvegen, Berfin. 2006. Territories, identities, and thresholds: The Saturday Mothers phenomenon in İstanbul. Signs 31, no.3: 689-715. Kalaycıoğlu, Ersin and Çarkoğlu, Ali. 2007. Turkish democracy today: Elections, protest and stability in an Islamic society. London: I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd.
13 Social movements in Europe Marsh, Alan and Kaase, Max. 1979. Background of political action. In Political action: Mass participation in five Western democracies, eds. Samuel. H. Barnes and Max Kaase, 97-136. London: Sage.
14 Presentations
15 Review
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Books (see above), power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
50
Presentation / Jury
3
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
9
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
10
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
7
Presentation / Jury
3
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
253

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest