PSIR 643 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Nationalism and Citizenship
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 643
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The immediate objective of this course is to prepare the students for evaluating critically and employing in research theories and fundamental questions about nationalism, the modern nation-state and modern citizenship. This immediate objective serves the broader purpose of preparing the students for more complex comparative analysis in political science.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students who are successful in this course:
  • Will be able to understand and theorise nationalism in relation with the historical emergence of the modern nation-state;
  • Will be able to understand and theorise citizenship as formal encoding of the relation between the modern nation-state and the individual members of the political society;
  • Will be able to identify similarities and differences between various citizenship regimes around the world;
  • Will be able to understand sub- and supra-national citizenship forms;
  • Will be able to employ the theoretical perspectives explored throughout the course in individual academic research
Course Content The course is designed as a problem-based learning process involving two main learning activities: (1) seminars and (2) individual research projects. The seminar activities will offer the students the possibility of exploring the course topics under instructor’s guidance. The students are expected to actively participate in each seminar after having read the assigned bibliography, which is indicated by the instructor one week ahead of each seminar session. The course then offers the possibility for students to employ the knowledge accumulated during the seminar activities in individual research on relevant topics at their choice. The research process presupposes two stages. The students will first make one presentation in class of the general strategy of analysis and of the detailed structure of the research paper. The second and final stage will be the production of the final research paper to be submitted at the end of the semester. Each of these two stages will be supervised closely by the instructor. In conclusion, the students are expected to (1) attend all classes, (2) read the assignments, (3) participate in the debates on the seminar themes, and (4) follow the instructor’s guidance in preparing the individual research projects.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Explanation of the course syllabus and of other course materials, including the bibliography.
2 Seminar theme: Abstract Citizenship – The Social Contract and the Citizen Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
3 Seminar theme: Nationalism and the Making of the Modern Nation State Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
4 Seminar theme: Ethnic Citizenship (political theory) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
5 Seminar theme: Ethnic Citizenship (case studies) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
6 Seminar theme: Civic Citizenship (political theory) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
7 Seminar theme: Civic Citizenship (case studies) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
8 Seminar theme: Sub- and Supra-national citizenship forms Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
9 Review
10 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
11 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
12 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
13 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
14 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
15 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Power point presentations and other course documents, including evaluation forms for the research paper. All these will be provided by the instructor in electronic format on the course webpage. ANDERSON, Benedict. 2006. Imagined Communities. London: Verso. BAUBÖCK, Rainer and Andre LIEBICH, eds. 2010. "Is there (still) an East-West Divide in the Conception of Citizenship in Europe?" EUI Working Papers, RSCAS 2010/19. BELLAMY, Richard, Dario CASTIGLIONE, and Emilio SANTORO, eds.,2004. Lineages of European citizenship: rights, belonging, and participation in eleven nation-states. New York: Palgrave. BRUBAKER, Rogers, 1992. Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. BRUBAKER, Rogers, 2004. “In the Name of the Nation: Reflections on Nationalism and Patriotism”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 115–127. CARON, Jean-Francois, 2013. “Understanding and interpreting France’s national identity: The meanings of being French”, National Identities, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 223-237. DELANTY, Gerard, 1997. “Models of Citizenship: Defining European Identity and Citizenship”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 285-303. ENJOLRAS, Bernard, 2008. “Two hypotheses about the emergence of a post-national European model of citizenship”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 12, No. 5, pp. 495-505. GIDDENS, Anthony. 1985. The Nation-state and Violence. Cambridge: Polity Press. HEATER, Derek, 1999, What is citizenship? Malden, Mass.: Polity Press. HEATER, Derek, 2004, A brief history of citizenship. New York: New York University Press. HERZOG, Tamar, 2007. “Communities Becoming a Nation: Spain and Spanish America in the Wake of Modernity (and Thereafter)”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 151–172. HOBSBAWM, Eric. 1990. Nations and nationalism since 1780: programme, myth, reality. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. HUTCHINSON, John and Anthony D. SMITH, eds., 1994, Nationalism. New York: Oxford University Press. JOPPKE, Christian, 2007. “Transformation of Citizenship: Status, Rights, Identity”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 37–48. KALBERG, Stephen, 1997. “Tocqueville and Weber on the Sociological Origins of Citizenship: The Political Culture of American Democracy”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 199-222. MAYALL, James. 1999. Sovereignty, nationalism, and self-determination. In: R. JACKSON, ed., Sovereignty at the millennium. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999, pp. 52-80. MURPHY, Michael and Siobhan HARTY, 2003. Post-Sovereign Citizenship, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 181-197. O’NEIL, Patrick H., 2010. Essentials in comparative politics, third edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. PREUSS, Ulrich K., 2003. “Citizenship and the German Nation”, Citizenship Studies, Vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 37-56. SMITH, Anthony D. 1971. Theories of Nationalism. London: Gerald Duckworth & Co. SMITH, Anthony D. 2003. Nationalism and Modernism. London and New York: Routledge.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
6
30
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
8
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
6
15
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
92
Seminar / Workshop
6
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
250

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest