PSIR 644 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
State
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 644
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to give students insight into the different notions of the state and current debates and to provide further analysis on the different perspectives of the state that exist in the political science literature.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Compare and contrast the different perspectives on the state
  • Discuss how the presence of resources affects a state
  • Analyze how states are formed
  • Assess whether or not certain political requisites for successful industrialization in the late 20th century exist
  • Identify the major thinkers and debates surrounding different theories of the state
  • Trace the development and evolution of each of the major theories including any current developments that may be under way
  • Identify the complex interconnections between class, the economy and the state in capitalist societies
  • Identify the major debates surrounding the autonomy of the state
Course Content This course will discuss the state under three separate headings: State formation, theories of political development and political regimes and democratization. Under state formation theories of state formation, the concept of weak states, and the “resource curse” will be analyzed. Under Theories of Political Development, modernization theory and Marxist theories such as dependency theory will be addressed. Under Political Regimes and Democratization, regimes, democratization, consolidation and democratic breakdown, dictatorships/authoritarian regimes and accountability will be discussed.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Charles Tilly, “War Making and State Making as Organized Crime, “in Bringing the State Back In Mancur Olson. “The Criminal Metaphor,” from Power and Prosperity. NY: Basic Books, 2000, pp. 3-24
2 Theories of State Formation Charles Tilly. The Formation of National States in Western Europe. Hendrick Spruyt. The Sovereign State and Its Competitors. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994. Charles Tilly. Coercion, Capital, and the European States. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1990. Stephen Krasner. Sovereignty. Princeton: Princeton University Press, chapters 1 and 2 or the argument’s earlier manifestation in Stephen Krasner. “Approaches to the State: Alternative Conceptions and Historical Dynamics,” Comparative Politics, 16, January 1984: 223-246. Albert Hirschman, “Exit, Voice, and the State,” World Politics, 31, 1 (1978): 90-107. Levi, Margaret. 1988. Of Rule and Revenue. Berkeley: University of California Press.
3 Weak States Joel Migdal. “Strong States, Weak States,” in Myron Weiner and Samuel Huntington, Understanding Political Development. Illinois: Scott Foresman/Little Brown, 1987. Robert Jackman and Carl Rosberg, “Why Africa’s Weak States Persist: The Empirical and the Juridical in Statehood,” World Politics, 1982: 1-24. Jeffrey Herbst. States and Power in Africa. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.
4 The “Resource Curse” Michael Ross, “Does Oil Hinder Democracy?” World Politics, April 2001. Macartan Humphreys, “Natural Resources, Conflict, and Conflict Resolution: Uncovering the Mechanisms,” Journal of Conflict Resolution, 49, 4 (2005): 508- 537. Terry Lynn Karl, The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro States, University of California Press, 1997
5 Modernization Theory Daniel Lerner. The Passing of Traditional Society. Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press, 1958, chapter 1. Karl Deutsch, “Social Mobilization and Political Development,” in Jason Finkle and Richard Gable, eds., Political Development and Social Change, 1971, pp. 384-401. Seymour Martin Lipset. Political Man: The Social Bases of Politics. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1960, chapter 2. Alex Inkeles, “The Modernization of Man,” in Myron Weiner, ed., Modernization, New York: Basic Books, 1966: 138-150. Ronald Inglehart. Modernization and Postmodernization. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997 Ronald Inglehart and Wayne Baker. “Modernization, Globalization, and the Persistence of Tradition: Empirical Evidence from 65 Societies,” American Sociological Review, 65 (2000): 19-51.
6 Institutionalization and Order Samuel Huntington. Political Order in Changing Societies, 1968, pp. 1-92 and 344-461. Samuel P. Huntington and Joan M. Nelson. No Easy Choice: Political Participation in Developing Countries. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1976.
7 Marx and His Successors Karl Marx. The Communist Manifesto J. Samuel Valenzuela and Arturo Valenzuela, “Modernization and Dependency: Alternative Perspectives in the Study of Latin American Underdevelopment,” Comparative Politics, 10, 4 (July 1978): 535-552. Fernando Henrique Cardozo and Enzo Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America, University of California Press, 1979, pp. viii-xxv, 177-216. Andre Gunder Frank, “The Development of Underdevelopment,” in The Political Economy of Development and Underdevelopment, 109-120. Thomas Bierstecker. Distortion or Development? Cambridge: MIT Press, 1978 Tony Smith, “The Underdevelopment of Development Literature: The Case of Dependency Theory,” World Politics 31 (January 1979): 247-288.
8 Regimes Aristotle, from The Politics. Book 4, iv, x, xii and Book 5 vi. Robert Dahl. Polyarchy: Participation and Opposition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1971. Carl Friedrich and Zbigniew Brzezinski. Totalitarian Dictatorship and Autocracy. (1965), pp. 14-29. Samuel Huntington, “Social and Institutional Dynamics of One-Party Systems,” in S. P Huntington and C. H. Moore, ed., Authoritarian Politics in Modern Society (1970): 3-44. Alfred Stepan. Rethinking Military Politics. Joseph Schumpeter. Capitalism, Socialism, & Democracy. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1947
9 Democratization Seymour Martin Lipset. “Some Social Requisites of Democracy,” American Political Science Review, 1959. Barrington Moore. Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. 1968 (see also or as a reader’s guide: Theda Skocpol, “A Critical Review of Barrington Moore’s Social Politics and Society, fall 1973) Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens, and John Stephens. Capitalist Development and Democracy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, chapters 1, 2, and 3. Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter, Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. Samuel Huntington. The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century. Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991, pp. xiii-xv, chapters 1-4.* Robert Bates, “The Impulse to Reform,” in Jennifer Widner, ed., Economic Change and Political Liberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. Eva Bellin. “The Robustness of Authoritarianism in the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective,” Comparative Politics, 36, 2 (2004): 139-157. Dankwart Rustow, “Transitions to Democracy,” Comparative Politics, 2:3 (1970), 337-63. 12 E.E., Schattschneider, The Semi-Sovereign People. Hinsdale, IL: Dreyden Press, 1960. Daniel Brinks, and M Coppedge. 2006. "Diffusion is no illusion: Neighbor emulation in the third wave of democracy." Comparative Political Studies 39 (4):463-89. Adam Przeworski et. al. Democracy and Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Carles Boix and Susan Stokes, “Endogenous Democratization,” World Politics, 58, 4 (July 2003): 517-549. Carles Boix, Democracy and Redistribution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson. 2006. Economic origins of dictatorship and democracy: Cambridge Univ Pr. Valerie Bunce. 2000. "Comparative democratization." Comparative Political Studies 33 (6-7):703-34. John Londregan. “Does High Income Promote Democracy?” World Politics, 49, 1 (1996): 1-30 (with Keith Poole) Jennifer Widner. “Political Reform in Anglophone and Francophone African Countries,” in Jennifer Widner, ed., Economic Change and Political Liberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994, pp. 49-79. Deborah Yashar. Demanding Democracy: Reform and Reaction in Costa Rica and Guatemala. Stanford University Press, 1997.
10 Democratization Seymour Martin Lipset. “Some Social Requisites of Democracy,” American Political Science Review, 1959. Barrington Moore. Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. 1968 (see also or as a reader’s guide: Theda Skocpol, “A Critical Review of Barrington Moore’s Social Politics and Society, fall 1973) Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens, and John Stephens. Capitalist Development and Democracy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, chapters 1, 2, and 3. Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter, Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. Samuel Huntington. The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century. Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991, pp. xiii-xv, chapters 1-4.* Robert Bates, “The Impulse to Reform,” in Jennifer Widner, ed., Economic Change and Political Liberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. Eva Bellin. “The Robustness of Authoritarianism in the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective,” Comparative Politics, 36, 2 (2004): 139-157. Dankwart Rustow, “Transitions to Democracy,” Comparative Politics, 2:3 (1970), 337-63. 12 E.E., Schattschneider, The Semi-Sovereign People. Hinsdale, IL: Dreyden Press, 1960. Daniel Brinks, and M Coppedge. 2006. "Diffusion is no illusion: Neighbor emulation in the third wave of democracy." Comparative Political Studies 39 (4):463-89. Adam Przeworski et. al. Democracy and Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Carles Boix and Susan Stokes, “Endogenous Democratization,” World Politics, 58, 4 (July 2003): 517-549. Carles Boix, Democracy and Redistribution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson. 2006. Economic origins of dictatorship and democracy: Cambridge Univ Pr. Valerie Bunce. 2000. "Comparative democratization." Comparative Political Studies 33 (6-7):703-34. John Londregan. “Does High Income Promote Democracy?” World Politics, 49, 1 (1996): 1-30 (with Keith Poole) Jennifer Widner. “Political Reform in Anglophone and Francophone African Countries,” in Jennifer Widner, ed., Economic Change and Political Liberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994, pp. 49-79. Deborah Yashar. Demanding Democracy: Reform and Reaction in Costa Rica and Guatemala. Stanford University Press, 1997.
11 Consolidation and Democratic Breakdown Juan J. Linz and Alfred Stepan. Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation: Southern Europe, South America, and Post-Communist Europe. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1996. pp. 1-65. Larry Diamond. Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, chapters 3-6. Nancy Bermeo. Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times: The Citizenry and the Breakdown of Democracy. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003. 13 Ellen Lust-Okar and Amaney Jamal. “Regimes and Rules: Reassessing the Influence of Regime Type on Electoral Law Formation,” Comparative Political Studies, 35, 3 (2002).
12 Dictatorships/Authoritarian Regimes Myerson, Roger. 2008. “The Autocrat's Credibility Problem and Foundations of the Constitutional State,” American Political Science Review 102 (February): 125-139. Pages 133-137 only. Kuran, Timur. 1991. “Now Out of Never: The Element of Surprise in the East European Revolution of 1989 (in Liberalization and Democratization in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe),” World Politics 44 (October): 7-48. Lisa Wedeen. 1999. Ambiguities of Domination : Politics, Rhetoric, and Symbols in Contemporary Syria. University of Chicago Press. (*) Wintrobe, Ronald. 1990. “The Tinpot and the Totalitarian: An Economic Theory of Dictatorship,” American Political Science Review 84 (September): 849-872. Magaloni, Beatriz. 2006. Voting for Autocracy: Hegemonic Party Survival and its Demise in Mexico. New York: Cambridge University Press. Introduction and chapter 1. Jones, Benjamin F. and Olken, Benjamin A. 2006. “Do leaders matter? National leadership and growth since World War II,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 120(3): 835–864. Levitsky, S, and LA Way. 2002. "The rise of competitive authoritarianism." Journal of Democracy 13 (2):51-65.
13 Accountability Herbert Kitschelt & Steven I. Wilkinson. 2007. Patrons, Clients and Policies: Patterns of Democratic Accountability and Political Competition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Chapters 1 and 14. Susan C. Stokes. 2005. “Perverse Accountability: A Formal Model of Machine Politics with Evidence from Argentina,” American Political Science Review 99 (August): 315-325.
14 Presentations
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Scholarly books, book chapters, articles power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials Recommended readings (further published works and scholarship on European diplomatic and military history)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
2
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
1
60
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
38
Final Exam
1
    Total
218

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest