PSIR 646 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
New Approaches and Concepts in Comparative Politics
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 646
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The immediate objective of this course is to familiarise the students with the latest approaches and concepts employable in the comparative study of politics. This immediate objective serves the broader purpose of preparing the students for more complex comparative analysis in political science.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students who are successful in this course: Will be able to understand the basic concepts and types of approaches (the comparative method) involved in the comparative study of politics;
  • Will be able to understand the different levels of comparison (state, institutional, society) employed in the comparative analysis of politics;
  • Will be able to recognise different types of political regimes;
  • Will understand the centrality of the concept of liberal democracy to the comparative study of politics;
  • Will be able to understand relations between states and societies from comparative perspective;
  • Will be able to employ the theoretical aspects explored throughout the course in individual academic research.
Course Content The course is designed as a problem-based learning process involving two main learning activities: (1) seminars and (2) individual research projects. The seminar activities will offer the students the possibility of exploring the course topics under instructor’s guidance. The students are expected to actively participate in each seminar after having read the assigned bibliography, which is indicated by the instructor one week ahead of each seminar session. The course then offers the possibility for students to employ the knowledge accumulated during the seminar activities in individual research on relevant topics at their choice. The research process presupposes two stages. The students will first make one presentation in class of the general strategy of analysis and of the detailed structure of the research paper. The second and final stage will be the production of the final research paper to be submitted at the end of the semester. Each of these two stages will be supervised closely by the instructor. In conclusion, the students are expected to (1) attend all classes, (2) read the assignments, (3) participate in the debates on the seminar themes, and (4) follow the instructor’s guidance in preparing the individual research projects.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Explanation of the course syllabus and of other course materials, including the bibliography.
2 Seminar theme: The Comparative Method (1) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
3 Seminar theme: The Comparative Method (2) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
4 Seminar theme: The Comparative Method (3) Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
5 Seminar theme: Terms of Comparison in the Study of States Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
6 Seminar theme: Terms of Comparison in the Study of Institutions Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
7 Seminar theme: Terms of Comparison in the Study of Societies Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
8 Seminar theme: Terms of Comparison in the Study of Policies, Political Movements and Processes Specific reading assignments to be selected by the instructor from the list below and announced one week before the seminar.
9 Review
10 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
11 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
12 Individual research projects: the general strategy of analysis – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
13 Individual research projects: the structure of the research paper – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
14 Individual research projects: the structure of the research paper – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
15 Individual research projects: the structure of the research paper – individual presentations Students’ selection of sources relevant for the individual research projects.
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Power point presentations and other course documents, including evaluation forms for the research paper. All these will be provided by the instructor in electronic format on the course webpage. BLONDEL, J. 2005, “The central role of comparative politics in political analysis”, Scandinavian Political Science, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 183-191. CARAMANI, D 2008, Comparative politics, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. CARAMANI, D. 2010, ‘Debate on the future of comparative politics: A rejoinder’, European Political Science, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 78-82. FINNEMORE, M. and SIKKINK, K., 2001. “Taking stock: The constructivist research program in international relations and comparative politics”, Annual Review of Political Science, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 391-416. HAGUE, Robert and M. HARROP, 2007. Comparative government and politics: An introduction, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke and New York. LEBOW, Richard N. and Mark I. LICHBACH, eds., 2007. Theory and evidence in comparative politics and international relations, New York: Palgrave Macmillan. O’DONNELL, G.A., 2001. “Democracy, law, and comparative politics”, Studies in Comparative International Development, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 7–36. O’NEIL, Patrick H., 2010. Essentials in comparative politics, third edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. VAN KERSBERGEN, K., 2010. “Comparative politics: some points for discussion”, European Political Science, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 49-61. WIARDA, H.J. 1998, “Is comparative politics dead? Rethinking the field in the post-Cold War era”, Third World Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 935-949. WIGELL, M., 2008. “Mapping ‘hybrid regimes’: Regime types and concepts in comparative politics”, Democratization, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 230–250.
Suggested Readings/Materials As indicated in class on each course day.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
6
30
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
8
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
1
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
92
Seminar / Workshop
6
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
175

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

X
9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest