PSIR 662 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Political Economy of European Integration
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 662
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The main goal of this class is to analyze the interaction of economics and politics between the European Union and the member states in the context of policy-making and policies in several key areas. The history and reasons behind the economic and monetary integration of Europe will be discussed as well as the different agreements and their contributions to the Europe of today, recent enlargements along with the financial crisis currently under way.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Differentiate between a Free Trade Area, Customs Union and Economic Union.
  • Analyze how the economic development of Europe affected the different regions in the post-World War II era.
  • Explain the differences between the economic development of West and East Europe
  • Outline the contribution of the U.S.A. to European integration.
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of different states in deciding upon the future of their currencies.
  • Compare and contrast the different types of central banks that exist.
  • Analyze how the current financial crisis has affected the monetary integration of the EU.
Course Content This course provides an introduction to the political economy of the European Union. A purely economic or political background to the European Union would leave students with an incomplete view of the future of the Union. This course will address the main policies of the EU touching upon its economic as well as political approach and will aim to give students an interdisciplinary understanding of the Union and why the member states have decided to join their currencies in a currency union. It will also address the latest financial crisis that has engulfed the EU and will try to assess the future of the monetary union.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Inttroduction Theo Hitiris, European Union Economics, London: FT Prentice Hall, 2003. Fifth Edition., chp. 1 David N. Balaam and Michael Veseth. “The European Union: The Economics and Politics of Integration” in Introduction to Political Economy, Second Edition, 2001. p. 231-251
2 Economic History of Europe Barry Eichengreen. “Innovation and Integration: Europe’s Economy Since 1945” Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 1
3 Optimum Currency Areas De Grauwe, Paul. Economics of Monetary Union, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Ninth Edition., chp. 1 & 2
4 Costs and Benefits of a Common Currency De Grauwe, Paul. Economics of Monetary Union, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Ninth Edition., chp. 3 & 4
5 European Central Bank De Grauwe, Paul. Economics of Monetary Union, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Ninth Edition., Chp. 8 Caner Bakır, Merkezdeki Banka: Türkiye Cumhuriyet Merkez Bankası ve Uluslararası Bir Karşılaştırma. İstanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi Yayınları, 2007.
6 Fiscal Policy, Stability and Growth Pact and Recent Developments De Grauwe, Paul. Economics of Monetary Union, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Ninth Edition., Chp. 10 Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 18
7 The Budget of the EU McDonald, Frank & Stephen Dearden. European Economic Integration, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2005., ch. 4 Nello, Susan Senior. The European Union: Economics, Policies and History, London: McGraw Hill, 2011. Third Edition., ch. 11
8 Common Agricultural Policy Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 12 Riley, Geoff. Economics Case Study: European Common Agricultural Policy, 2003. McDonald, Frank & Stephen Dearden. European Economic Integration, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2005., ch. 11 Theo Hitiris, European Union Economics, London: FT Prentice Hall, 2003. Fifth Edition., chp. 7 Nello, Susan Senior. The European Union: Economics, Policies and History, London: McGraw Hill, 2011. Third Edition., ch. 12
9 Regional Policy Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 13 McDonald, Frank & Stephen Dearden. European Economic Integration, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2005., ch. 8 Theo Hitiris, European Union Economics, London: FT Prentice Hall, 2003. Fifth Edition., chp. 10 Nello, Susan Senior. The European Union: Economics, Policies and History, London: McGraw Hill, 2011. Third Edition., ch. 15
10 External Trade Policy Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 15 McDonald, Frank & Stephen Dearden. European Economic Integration, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2005., ch. 12 Theo Hitiris, European Union Economics, London: FT Prentice Hall, 2003. Fifth Edition., chp. 8 Nello, Susan Senior. The European Union: Economics, Policies and History, London: McGraw Hill, 2011. Third Edition., ch. 18 & 19
11 Competition Policy Riley, Geoff. Economics Case Study: European Competition Policy and the Single European Market, 2003. Baldwin, Richard and Charles Wyplosz. The Economics of European Integration, London: McGraw Hill, 2012. Fourth Edition, Chp. 14 McDonald, Frank & Stephen Dearden. European Economic Integration, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2005., ch. 5 Nello, Susan Senior. The European Union: Economics, Policies and History, London: McGraw Hill, 2011. Third Edition., ch. 17 Case Study: Volkswagen and Nintendo
12 Taxation Policy Theo Hitiris, European Union Economics, London: FT Prentice Hall, 2003. Fifth Edition., chp. 5
13 Student Presentations
14 Student Presentations
15 Overview of the semester
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Scholarly books, book chapters, articles power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
1
60
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
38
Final Exam
    Total
256

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest