PSIR 663 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Foreign Relations of the EU
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 663
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course is designed for graduate students to provide specialized knowledge of dynamics of the European Union (EU)’s relations with third parties and its role in the international arena. It also aims to develop students’ analytical and research skills.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • classify integration theories
  • analyze the institutional factors in the EU policy making processes
  • explain the EU enlargement theoretically
  • analyze the role of norms in the EU’s external relations
  • identify the role of economic factors in EU’s relations with third parties
Course Content This advanced course addresses the characterisitcs of EU’s relations with the third parties. Following a brief overview of theories of European Integration, formulation and implementation processes of EU policy making towards the world outside its borders will be analyzed. Lastly, students will analyze a wide range of policy instruments of the EU in its relations with the third parties.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Policymaking in the EU 1) Moravcsik, Andrew “Preferences and Power in the European Community: A Liberal Intergovernmentalist Approach,” Journal of Common Market Studies 31 (1993), pp: 473-524. 2) Pierson, Paul “The Path to European Integration; A Historical Institutionalist Analysis, Comparative Political Studies 29:2 (1996), pp: 123-163.
3 EU External Relations 1- Federiga Bindi and Jeremy Shapiro, “EU Foreign Policy: Myth or Reality?” Chapter 25 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 339-348 2- Federiga Bindi, “European Union Foreign Policy: A Historical Overview,” Chapter 1 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 13-40 3- Ulrich Krotz, “Momentum and Impediments: Why Europe Won’t Emerge as a Full Political Actor on the World Stage Soon,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 47, No. 3 (June 2009), pp. 555-578
4 EU Common Foreign Policy? 1- Nicola Verola, “The New EU Foreign Policy under the Treaty of Lisbon,” Chapter 2 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 41-50 2- Tony Barber, “The Appointments of Herman van Rompuy and Catherine Ashton,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 48, Supplement (September 2010), pp. 55-67 3- Jeffrey Lewis, “EU Policy on Iraq: The Collapse and Reconstruction of Consensus-Based Foreign Policy,” International Politics, Vol. 46, No. 4 (July 2009), pp. 432-450
5 Security Dimension 1- Stephan Keukeleire, “European Security and Defense Policy: From Taboo to a Spearhead of EU Foreign Policy?” Chapter 3 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 51-72 2- Asle Toje, “The European Union as a Small Power,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 49, No.1 (January 2011), pp. 43-60 3- Mika Luoma-aho, " ‘Arm’ versus ‘Pillar’: The Politics of Metaphors of the Western European Union at the 1990-91 Intergovernmental Conference on Political Union,” Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 11, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 106-127
6 European Neighbourhood Policy 1- Tom Casier, “The European Neighborhood Policy: Assessing the EU’s Policy towards the Region,” Chapter 6 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 99-118 2- Hiski Haukkala, “The European Union as a Regional Normative Hegemon: The Case of European Neighbourhood Policy,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 60, No. 9 (November 2008), pp. 1601-1622 3- Sabine Fischer, “The European Union and Security in the Black Sea Region after the Georgia Crisis,” Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, Vol. 9, No. 3 (September 2009), pp. 333- 349 4- Khalid Emara, “Is Sarkozy’s Union for the Mediterranean Going to Work?,” Chapter 13 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 197-200
7 Transatlantic Relations 1- Andrew Moravcsik, “US-EU Relations: Putting the Bush Years in Perspective,” Chapter 14 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 203-208 2- Marta Dassu and Roberto Menotti, “Economics and Security: A Reverse Alliance,” Chapter 15 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 209-219 3- Finn Laursen, “EU-Canada Relations: A Case of Mutual Neglect?” Chapter 17 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 230-238 4- Daniel C Thomas, “Rejecting the US Challenge to the International Criminal Court: Normative Entrapment and Compromise in EU Policy-Making,” International Politics, Vol. 46, No. 4 (July 2009), pp. 376-394
8 EU as an Economic Power 1- Benjamin J. Cohen, “Dollar Dominance, Euro Aspirations: Recipe for Discord?” Journal of Common Market Studies Vol. 47, No. 4, (September 2009), pp. 741-766 2- Jean-Claude Trichet, “State of the Union: The Financial Crisis and the ECB’s Response between 2007 and 2009,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 48, No. 4 (September 2010), pp. 7-19 3- Kevin Featherstone, “The Greek Sovereign Debt Crisis and EMU: A Failing State in a Skewed Regime,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 49, No. 2 (March 2011)
9 EU Trade Policy 1- Andreas Dür and Hubert Zimmermann, “Introduction: The EU in International Trade Negotiations,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 45, No. 4 (November 2007), pp. 771- 87 2- Steven McGuire and Johan Lindeque, “The Diminishing Returns to Trade Policy in the European Union,” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 48, No. 5 (November 2010), pp. 1329-1349 3- Alan Matthews, “The European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy and Developing Countries: the Struggle for Coherence,” Journal of European Integration, Vol. 30, No. 3 (July 2008), pp. 381–399 4- Alberto Heimler, “Competition Policy as a Tool of EU Foreign Policy: Multilateralism, Bilateralism, and Soft Convergence,” Chapter 6 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 82-98 5- Mitchell Smith, “Single Market, Global Competition: Regulating the European Market in a Global Economy,” Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 17, No. 7 (October 2010), pp. 936- 953
10 Development Aid Policy 1- Maurizio Carbone, “The EU in Africa: Increasing Coherence, Decreasing Partnership,” Chapter 18 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 239-252 2- Joaquin Roy, “Relations between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean: Competition or Cooperation with the United States?” Chapter 6 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 220-229 3- Martin Holland, “The EU and the Global Development Agenda,” Journal of European Integration, Vol. 30, No. 3 (July 2008), pp. 343–362 4- Ole Elgström, “Trade and Aid? The Negotiated Construction of EU Policy on Economic Partnership Agreements,” International Politics, Vol. 46, No. 4 (July 2009), pp. 451-468
11 Environment and Global Crime 1- Charles Parker and Christer Karlsson, “Climate Change and the European Union's Leadership Moment: An Inconvenient Truth?” Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 48, No. 4 (September 2010), pp. 923-943 2- Francesca Longo, “Justice and Home Affairs as a New Tool of European Foreign Policy,” Chapter 4 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 73-81 3- Sarah Wolff, “The Mediterranean Dimension of EU Counter-terrorism,” Journal of European Integration, Vol. 31, No. 1 (January 2009), pp. 137 – 156 4- Heli Askola, “Violence against Women, Trafficking, and Migration in the European Union,” European Law Journal, Vol. 13, No. 2 (March 2007), pp. 204-217
12 Role of Human Rights 1- Laura Ferreira-Pereira, “Human Rights Peace, and Democracy: Is “Model Power Europe” a Contradiction in Terms?” Chapter 22 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 290- 302 2- Elena Baracani, “US and EU Strategies for Promoting Democracy,” Chapter 22 in The Foreign Policy of the European Union, pp. 303-318
13 EU Enlargement 1- Gergana Noutcheva, “Fake, Partial and Imposed Compliance: the Limits of the EU's Normative Power in the Western Balkans,” Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 16, No. 7 (October 2009), pp.1065-1084 2- John A. Scherpereel, “European Culture and the European Union's 'Turkey Question,'” West European Politics, Vol. 33, No 4 (July 2010), pages 810 - 829
14 Concluding Remarks Reading Material and power point presentations
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
85
Presentation / Jury
1
75
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
250

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

X
11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest