PSIR 506 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Turkey-EU Relations
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 506
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to explain the fundamental EU enlargement theories (rationalism and constructivism)
  • to explain the dynamics of the process of enlargement
  • to examine Turkey-EU relations in a historical perspective
  • to apply the theories of EU enlargement to Turkey-EU relations
  • to make comparisons with other enlargement rounds
  • to analyze the political, legal and official dimensions of Turkey’s EU accession process
Course Content

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Situating Turkey’s EU accession in EU studies/Reading and Presentation Skills -Schimmelfennig, F. and Sedelmeier, U. (2002) ‘Theorizing EU enlargement: research focus, hypotheses, and the state of research’, Journal of European Public Policy 9(4): 500-528.
3 From the Association Agreement 1963 to the Custom Union 1995 - Aydın, Mustafa (2003) ‘The Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy, and Turkey’s European Vocation’ The Review of International Affairs 3(2):306-331. - Kabaalioglu (1998) The Custom Union: A final step before Turkey’s Accession to the EU, 113-140 - Arıkan, H. (2003) Turkey and the EU (Ashgate): 59-69 - Hartler, Christina and Sam Laird (1999) The EU Model and Turkey. A Case for Thanksgiving, Journal of World Trade (33) 3, 147-165 - World Bank (2014) Evaluation of the EU-Turkey Customs Union, http://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/Worldbank/document/eca/turkey/tr-eu-customs-union-eng.pdf
4 Eastern Enlargement, Luxemburg 1997 and Helsinki 1999 -MüftülerBaç, M. and Mclaren, L. M. (2003) ‘Enlargement preferences and policymaking in the European Union: Impacts on Turkey’, European Integration 25: 17-30 - -Barnes, I. and Barnes, P. (2007) ‘Enlargement’, in Cini, M. (ed) European Union Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press): 421-440 - -Eralp, A. ‘Turkey in the enlargement process: From Luxembourg to Helsinki’ - -Susanna Verney (2007) The dynamics of EU accession: Turkish travails in comparative perspective - -Yilmaz, Bahri (2008) The Relation of Turkey with the EU: Candidate forever?, Center for European Studies Working Paper Series, No. 167, chapter 3-4
5 From Candidate Status 1999 to the Opening of Accession Talks in 2005 -Akçapar, B. (2007) Turkey’s new European era (Rowman and Littlefield): 11-56. - -Schimmelfennig, Frank (2008), ‘Entrapped again: The way to EU membership negotiations with Turkey’, UCD Dublin European Institute, Working Paper 8, http://www.ucd.ie/dei/wp/WP_08-8_Schimmelfennig.pdf - McLaren, Lauren (2007), ‘Explaining Opposition to Turkish Membership of the EU’, European Union Politics, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 251 – 278
6 The organization and progress of the accession talks - European Commission: Understanding Enlargement, http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/pdf/publication/enl-understand_en.pdf (online) - -Ugur, M. (2010) Open-Ended Membership Prospect and Commitment Credibility: Explaining the Deadlock in EU–Turkey Accession Negotiations, Journal of Common Market Studies, 4(4): 967-991. - Marc Pierini (2017) EU-Turkey Relations Confined to Core Priorities, https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/74791
7 Europeanisation of Turkey - -Tocci, N. (2005) ‘Europeanization in Turkey: Trigger or Anchor for Reform?’, South European Society and Politics 10(1): 73-83 -Bürgin, A. (2017) Why the EU still matters in Turkish Domestic Politics: Insights from Recent Reforms in Migration Policy 21(1):105-118 Schimmelfennig, F. (2003) ‘Costs, Commitment and Compliance: The Impact of EU Democratic Conditionality on Latvia, Slovakia and Turkey’, Journal of Common Market Studies 41(3): 495518 (online) - -Bürgin, Alexander (2011): Why Turkey is ready for a readmission agreement, Journal of European Public Policy (online) -
8 Midterm Exam
9 Economical and Political Implications of Turkey’s EU accession (1) -Ülgen, S. (2017) Trade As Turkey’s EU Anchor, Carnegie Europe, https://carnegieeurope.eu/2017/12/13/trade-as-turkey-s-eu-anchor-pub-75002; - Kirişci/Ekim (2015) Why an EU-Turkey Customs Union Upgrade is Good for Turkey, The German Marshall Fund of the US; http://www.gmfus.org/publications/why-eu-turkey-customs-union-upgrade-good-turkey, http://www.gmfus.org/publications/why-eu-turkey-customs-union-upgrade-good-turkey Ugur, M. (2008) Economic implications of Turkish EU membership: the advantage of tying one’s hand, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18547/1/MPRA_paper_18547.pdf -MüftülerBaç, M. (2004) ‘Turkey’s accession to the European Union: Institutional and Security Challenges’, Perceptions, Autumn: 29-43 (required: page 33-34)
10 Economical and Political Implications of Turkey’s EU accession (2) - Kirişci and Toygür (2019) Turkey’s new presidential system and a changing west, Implications for Turkish foreign policy and Turkish-West relations, Brookings, https://www.brookings.edu/research/turkeys-new-presidential-system-and-a-changing-west/; Müftüler-Bac/Gürsoy, Y. (2010): Is there a Europeanization of Turkey’s Foreign Policy, Turkish Studies, vol.11, no. 3 -Öniş, Ziya (2014) Turkey and the Arab Revolutions: Boundaries of Regional Power Influence in a Turbulent Middle East, Mediterranean Politics 19(2), 203-219.
11 Student Presentations
12 Student Presentations
13 Implications of Turkey’s EU membership prospects on European and national identities - Delhey, Jan (2007) Do enlargements make the EU less cohesive? An analysis of trust between EU nationalities, Journal of Common Market Studies, vol 45,2, 253-79 -Parker, Owen (2009), ’Cosmopolitan Europe and the EU-Turkey question: the politics of a common destiny’, Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 16, No. 7, pp. 1085-1101 -MacMillan, Cahterine (2010) Which identity for the European Union, http://www.e-ir.info/2010/03/21/which-identity-for-the-eu-implications-of-and-for-turkeys-accession/ (Online) -
14 Outlook: Future of EU Turkey Relations Müftüler-Bac (2017) Turkey’s future with the European Union: an alternative model of differentiated integration, Turkish Studies 18(3), Bürgin (2018): Despite the growing alienation between Turkey and the EU: A continuation of the accession process remains the best option, Orient 59(3) 24-32
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

Pieces from prestigious national and international press.

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EU Studies Certificate: The program is open for all 3rd grade students of any undergraduate programs of the IUE.  Students with an average of minimum 2.00 GPA in four EU-related courses, including one compulsory course (PSIR 201 - History and Institutions of the EU) and 3 elective courses will receive the Certificate. ​

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
25
Final Exam
1
25
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
75
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
25
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
40
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and to ultimately deepen and develop intellectual interest
2 To evaluate the relationships between factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture in a critical perspective 
3 To provide advanced competences to determine and question the theoretical and emprical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature 
4 To identify the political and cultual conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnic groups, gender and religion at national and international levels 
5 To provide competences to develop original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature
6 To determine, collect, resolve, and interpret the data that would measure the theories and concepts as variables by using scientific research methods in Political Science and International Relations field
7 To use confidently the terms and concepts of Political Science and International Relations 
8 To communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations to groups inside and outside the said discipline 
9 To take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in relation to politics in daily life 
10 To develop projects determining the institutional and political instruments for management of domestic and international conflicts 
11 To prepare an orginal thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations in accordance with scentific criteria 
12 To design and carry out a scientific research project in the field of Political Science and International Relations 
13 To have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of collecting, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations 

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest