PSIR 509 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Foreign Relations of the EU
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 509
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to classify integration theories in general and specifically European Integration theories
  • Will be able to identify the two fundamental enlargement theories – rational choice and constructivism
  • Will be able to analyze the institutional structure of the EU policy making in foreign policy
  • Will be able to define the technical details, stages and phases of the accession process
  • Will be able to analyze the security and identity dimensions of EU integration process
  • Will be able to evaluate the empirical information with regard to the history of EU institutional framework
Course Content

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Understanding European Integration 1) Moravcsik, Andrew “Preferences and Power in the European Community: A Liberal Intergovernmentalist Approach,” Journal of Common Market Studies 31 (1993), pp: 473-524. 2) Pierson, Paul “The Path to European Integration; A Historical Institutionalist Analysis, Comparative Political Studies 29:2 (1996), pp: 123-163.
3 Institutional Structure of the EU Policy Making: Three Pillars I 1) Wallace, Hellen An Institutional Anatomy and Five Policy Modes in Helen Wallace, William Wallace and Mark Pollack, (eds.), PolicyMaking in the European Union, 5th ed. (Oxford, 2000), pp: 49-90. 2) Hill, Christopher and William Wallace Actors and Actions in Christopher Hill, (ed.), The Actors in Europe’s Foreign Policy (Routledge, 1996), pp: 116 and 288-304.
4 Institutional Structure of the EU Policy Making: Three Pillars II 1) Smith, Karen E. EU External Relations in Michelle Cini (ed.), European Union Politics (Oxford, 2005), pp: 229-245. 2) Bretherton, Charlotte and John Vogler. The European Union as a Global Actor (London, 1999), pp: 15-45.
5 EU Enlargement I 1) Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier, “Theorizing EU enlargement: research focus, hypotheses, and the state of research,” Journal of European Public Policy 9:4 (August 2002), pp: 500-528. 2) Bieler, Andreas. “The struggle over EU enlargement: a historical materialist analysis of European integration,” Journal of European Public Policy 9:4 (August 2002), pp: 575-597.
6 EU Enlargement II 1) Schimmelfennig, Frank “The Community trap: liberal norms, rhetorical action, and the eastern enlargement of the European Union,” International Organization 55:1 (Winter 2002), pp: 47–80. 2) Glenn, John. EU Enlargement in Michelle Cini (ed.), European Union Politics (Oxford, 2005), pp:211-228
7 Midterm Exam
8 European Common Foreign and Security Policy 1) Wallace, William. Foreign and Security Policy in Helen Wallace, William Wallace and Mark Pollack, (eds.), PolicyMaking in the European Union, 5th ed. (Oxford, 2000), pp:429-456. 2) Gordon, Philip, “Europe’s Uncommon Foreign Policy,” International Security 22:3 (Winter 1997/98), pp: 74-100.
9 Transatlantic Relations 1) Kagan, Robert “Power and Weakness,” Policy Review 113 (June/July 2002), pp: 328. 2) Kupchan, Charles “The Rise of Europe, America's Changing Internationalism, and the End of U.S. Primacy,” Political Science Quarterly 118 (Summer 2003), pp: 205-231.
10 European Trade Policy 1) Woolcock, Stephen Trade Policy in Helen Wallace, William Wallace and Mark Pollack, (eds.), PolicyMaking in the European Union, 5th ed. (Oxford, 2000), pp: 377-400. 2)Young, Alasdair R. “The Adaptation of European Foreign Economic Policy: From Rome to Seattle,” Journal of Common Market Studies 38:1 (March 2000), pp: 93-116.
11 Development Aid Policy 1) Elgström, Ole “Norm negotiations: The construction of new norms regarding gender and development in EU foreign aid policy,” Journal of European Public Policy 7:3 (September 2000), pp: 457-476. 2)Forwood, Genevra. “The Road to Cotonou: Negotiating a Successor to Lomé,” Journal of Common Market Studies 39:3 (September 2001), pp: 423-442
12 EU’s Neighborhood Policy 1) FerreroWaldner, Benita “The European Neighbourhood Policy:The EU’s Newest Foreign Policy Instrument” European Foreign Affairs Review 11: (2006) pp:139–142. 2)Berg, Eiki and Piret Ehin “What Kind of Border Regime is in the Making?: Towards a Differentiated and Uneven Border Strategy” Cooperation and Conflict, 41:3 (2006) pp. 53-71.
13 Human Rights as the Bases of EU’s Identity 1) Youngs, Richard “Normative Dynamics and Strategic Interests in the EU’s External Identity,” Journal of Common Market Studies 42:2 (June 2004), pp:415-436. 2) Clapham, Andrew Where is the EU’s Human Rights Common Foreign Policy and How is it Manifested in Multilateral Fora? in Philip Alston (ed.), The EU and Human Rights (Oxford, 1999) pp: 627-683.
14 Concluding Remarks
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
20
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
20
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
6
Presentation / Jury
1
Project
1
70
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
40
Final Exam
    Total
230

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and to ultimately deepen and develop intellectual interest X
2 To evaluate the relationships between factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture in a critical perspective  X
3 To provide advanced competences to determine and question the theoretical and emprical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature  X
4 To identify the political and cultual conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnic groups, gender and religion at national and international levels  X
5 To provide competences to develop original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature
6 To determine, collect, resolve, and interpret the data that would measure the theories and concepts as variables by using scientific research methods in Political Science and International Relations field X
7 To use confidently the terms and concepts of Political Science and International Relations  X
8 To communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations to groups inside and outside the said discipline 
9 To take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in relation to politics in daily life 
10 To develop projects determining the institutional and political instruments for management of domestic and international conflicts  X
11 To prepare an orginal thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations in accordance with scentific criteria  X
12 To design and carry out a scientific research project in the field of Political Science and International Relations  X
13 To have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of collecting, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations  X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest