PSIR 560 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Gender Politics
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 560
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to gender related issues in political science. Issues such as inequality, patriarchy, representation in political life will be discussed in different contexts.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • To explain the political and economic context of struggles around gender issues
  • To utilize feminist methodologies
  • To analyze the institutional nature of feminist movements and struggles
  • To comprehend the interaction between religion and culture
Course Content Issues such as representation, political participation, women’s, men’s and LGBT organizations, development, and economic distribution will be addressed from a gendered point of view. A comparison of different countries will also be made to give students insight into the developed vs developing world when it comes to gender.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Conceptual Framework Lorber, Part I, Producing Gender, Chapters 1 & 4
3 Gender in Every Day Life Lorber Part II, Gender in Practice, Chapters 6 & 9
4 Gender Politics Lorber Part III, The Politics of Gender, Chapters 10 & 11
5 Gender and Global Governance Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 1 Gender Politics and Global Governance
6 Gender and the State Gender and the State – R.W. Connell, Citizenship and Gender – Ruth Lister
7 Feminist Movement I Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 6 Nongovernmental Organizations: An Alternative Power Base for Women? (Irene Tinker), Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 17 Of Roots, Leaves, and Trees: Gender, Social Movements, and Global Governance (Deborah Stienstra)
8 Feminist Movement II Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 8 International Women’s Activism and the 1994 Cairo Population Conference (Amy J. Higer), Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 11 The United Nations Women’s Conferences and Feminist Politics (Lois A. West)
9 Midterm
10 Women’s Rights as Human Rights Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 9 Shaping the Human Rights Agenda: The Case of Violence Against Women (Jutta Joachim), Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 10 Realizing Women’s Human Rights: Nongovernmental Organizations and the United Nations Treaty Bodies (Alice M. Miler)
11 Gender and Economy Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 12 What Is a Worker? Gender, Global Restructuring, and the ILO Convention on Homework (Elisabeth Prugl), Meyer and Prugl, Chapter 13 Women in the Neoliberal “Frame” (Anne Sisson Runyan)
12 Gender and Islam Moghadam, Chapter 3 Modernizing Women, Reforms, Revolutions, and the Woman Question Zurayk and Saadeh, Women as Mobilizers of Human Resources in Arab Countries Mernissi, Muslim Women and Fundamentalism
13 Gender in Turkey Marshall, Ideology, Progress and Dialogue: A Comparison of Feminist and Islamist Women’s Approaches to the Issue of Head Covering and Work in Turkey, Kagitcibasi, Status of Women in Turkey: A CrossCultural Perspective
14 The Feminist Movement in Popular Culture Brunsdon, Charlotte, “The Feminist in the Kitchen: Martha, Martha and Nigella”, Hermes, Joke, “’Ally McBeal’, ‘Sex and the City’ and the Tragic Success of Feminism
15 Conclusion & Review Lorber, Part I, Producing Gender, Chapters 1 & 4
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks • Meyer, Mary K., and Elisabeth Prugl, Gender Politics in Global Governance, Rowman and Littlefield, 1999. • Lorber, Judith, Paradoxes of Gender, Yale University Press, 1994. • Rubery, Jill, Mark Smith and Colette Fagan, Women’s Employment in Europe: Trends and Prospects, Routledge, 1999. • Moghadam, Valentine M. , Modernizing Women: Gender and Social Change in the Middle East, Rienner, 1993. • Zurayk, Huda C., and FAdia Saadeh, “Women as Mobilizers of Human Resources in Arab Countries”, in Khoury, Nabil F., and Valentine M. Moghadam, Gender and Development in the Arab World, Zed Books, 1995. • Hollows, Joanne and Rachel Moseley, Feminism in Popular Culture, Berg 2007. • Tickner, J. Ann, Gendering World Politics, Columbia, 2001. • Mernissi, Fatima, “Muslim Women and Fundamentalism”, Middle East Report, n153, 1988, 811. • Marshall, Gul Aldikacti, “Ideology, Progress and Dialogue: A Comparison of Feminist and Islamist Women’s Approaches to the Issue of Head Covering and Work in Turkey”, Gender and Society, v19 n1, 2005, 104120. • Kagitcibasi, Cigdem, “Status of Women in Turkey: A CrossCultural Perspective”, International Journal of Middle East Studies, v18 n4, 1986, 485499. • Enloe, Cynthia, Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics, University of California Press, 2000. • Yuval -Davis, Nira, Gender and Nation, Sage Publications, 1997.
Suggested Readings/Materials Further readings will be assigned as necessary during the course

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
35
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
8
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
20
Final Exam
1
30
    Total
248

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and to ultimately deepen and develop intellectual interest X
2 To evaluate the relationships between factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture in a critical perspective  X
3 To provide advanced competences to determine and question the theoretical and emprical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature  X
4 To identify the political and cultual conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnic groups, gender and religion at national and international levels  X
5 To provide competences to develop original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature X
6 To determine, collect, resolve, and interpret the data that would measure the theories and concepts as variables by using scientific research methods in Political Science and International Relations field X
7 To use confidently the terms and concepts of Political Science and International Relations  X
8 To communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations to groups inside and outside the said discipline  X
9 To take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in relation to politics in daily life  X
10 To develop projects determining the institutional and political instruments for management of domestic and international conflicts  X
11 To prepare an orginal thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations in accordance with scentific criteria  X
12 To design and carry out a scientific research project in the field of Political Science and International Relations  X
13 To have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of collecting, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations  X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest