FFD 602 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Integrated Approaches in Design
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
FFD 602
Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of the course is to ensure that PhD students with various design and/or disciplinary backgrounds develop a common and integrated design understanding through philosophy, culture, history, theory and contemporary discourse, and also by considering the interactions between arts and science fields.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop their own creative, theoretical and practical abilities for developing a critical and interdisciplinary insight into design
  • extend their design knowledge and understanding within an interdisiplinary approach
  • familiarize themselves with a wide range of interdisipjinary research
  • analyse and discuss the history, theory, philosophy and discourse of different design disciplines together at an advanced level
  • form and work in multi-disciplinary design teams
  • produce a high level academic outcome (paper, project etc.) that synthesizes the knowledge acquired from the course
Course Content This course is a research-based course that can be studied either on a theoretical route and/or theory-practice route. In the context of the course, the concepts related to the different areas of design will be discussed through an integrated approach by the theoretical framework and the developments from a historical perspective. Together with the development of the skills and understanding of a multi facet design approach, students are expected to develop an understanding and discuss the importance of inter/multidisciplinary teamwork and have a common knowledge and language for the formation of these design teams as the main objectives of the course.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course: Description of the weekly assignments: Sheet of Boxes
2 Design Thinking: What is Design? Designerly Ways of Thinking Reading: 1) Cross, N. (2001) “Designerly ways of knowing: Design discipline versus design science” Design Issues, Vol 17 No 3, 49-55. 2) Razzouk, R. & Shute V. (2012) “What is Design Thinking and Why is It Important?” Review of Educational Research, Vol 82No 3, pp. 330-348.
3 Design & Research Research Methods Reading: 1) Creswell, J. W. “Choosing a Mixed Methods Design
4 Design Research Reading: 1) Cross, N. (1999) “Design Research: A Disciplined Conversation” Design Issues, Vol. 15 No 2, pp. 5-10.
5 Ethics, Design & Arts: Aesthetics, Politics and Ethics Reading: 1) Fry, T. (2006) “Design, Ethics and Identity” Design Philosophy Papers, Vol 4 Iss 3, pp. 161-166. 2) Danto, A. C. (2009) “Aesthetics and the Work of Art” Design Studies: A Reader. Ed. Clark, H and Brody D., New York: Berg, pp.150-153. 3) Devon, R. & Van De Poel, I. (2004) “Design Ethics: The Social Ethics” Int. J. Engng Ed. Vol 20 No 3, pp. 461-469.
6 Design & Science Reading: 1) Norman, D. A. (2007) “The Future of Everyday Things” The Design of Future Things. 155-176. 2) Moles, A. (2009) “Design and Immateriality” Design Studies: A Reader. Ed. Clark, H and Brody D., New York: Berg, pp.377-383.
7 Equality, Social Justice, Collaborative Design Reading: 1) Kvan, Thomas (2000) “Collaborative Design: What is it?” Automation in Construction 9, pp. 409-415. 2) TBA
8 Innovation, Sustainability, Designing for a Safe Future Reading: 1) Papenk, V. (2009) “Designing for a Safe Future” Design Studie: A Reader. Ed. Clark, H and Brody D., New York: Berg, pp.469-473. 2) Wylant, B. (2008) “Design Thinking and the Experience of Innovation” Design Issues, Vol 24 No 2, pp. 3-14.
9 MIDTERM
10 Interaction Design: Communication and Design Reading: 1) Kolko, J. (2010) “Chapter 6: Interaction Design and Communication” Thoughts on Integration Design. Canada: Elsevier, pp. 105-118. 2) Fallman, D. (2008) “The Interaction Design Research Triangle of Design Practice, design Studies, and Design Exploration” Design Issues. Vol 24 No 3, pp. 4-18.
11 Service Design, User-Centered Design Reading: 3) Norman, D. A. (1988) The Design of Everyday Things. USA: Basic Book 4) TBA
12 Experiential Graphic /Environmental Design Reading: 1) Sanders, E. B.-N. (2002) “Scaffolds for Experiencing in the New Design Space” Information Design, Institute for Information Design Japan, IID.J, Graphic-Sha Publishing Co., Ltd 2) TBA
13 Student Presentations Student Term Project Proposals
14 Student Presentations Student Term Project Proposals
15 Term Revision Term Revision
16 Final Submission Final Submission Requirements

 

Course Notes/Textbooks None
Suggested Readings/Materials Bruce, M. & Rachel Cooper (1997) Marketing and Design Management. Thomson; Norman, D. A. (1990) The Design of Everyday Things. New York: Basic Books; Norman, D. A. (2007) The Design of Future Things. New York: Basic Books; Clark H. & Brody D. (eds) (2009) Design Studies: A Reader. New York: Berg; Kolko, J. (2010) Yhoughts on Intergration Design. Burlington: Elsevier; Victor Margolin (ed.), Design Discourse: History, Theory, Criticism, University of Chicago Press (1989); Bruce Archer, On the Methods of Research, METU Press, 1999; Cross, Nigel “Designerly Ways of Knowing”, Design Studies, vol 3 no 4 (1982), pp. 221-227; O.Osman Demirbaş and Halime Demirkan “Learning styles of design students and the relationship of academic performance and gender in design education”, Learning and Instruction, 17(2007), pp 345-359; Lent, R.W., Schmidt, J. and Schmidt, L “Collective efficacy beliefs in student work team: Relationton self-efficacy, cohesion, and performance” Journal of Vocational Behaviou, 68 (2006), pp. 73-84; Lee, K.C.K. “Principals of design leadership for industrial design teams in Taiwan” Design Studies (2007); Topalian, Alan “Frontline Roles for Design Leaders in the Multiverses of Business” Design Management Journal Vol 7 iss 1 (2012), pp. 29-29; Kvan, Thomas “Collaborative Design: What is it?” Automation in Construction 9 (2000), pp. 409-4015; Stempfle, Joachim and Badke-Schaub, Petra “Thinking in design teams – an analysis of team communication” Design Studies 23 (2002), pp. 473-496; David Adwards, Artscience, Creativity in the Post-Google Generation, Harvard University Press (2008); Sian Ede, Art and Science, I.B. Tauris (2005); Eliane Strosberg, Art and Science, Abbeville Press (2001); Macaulay, David R., Integrated Design, Ecotone Publishing (2008); Kellert, S. R., Biophilic Design: The Theory, Science and Practice of Bringing Buildings to Life, Wiley (2008)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
100
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
180
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
228

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

to be able to develop scientific expertise and capabilities in the field of design studies by using creative and critical thinking as well as research skills; innovatively contributing to the discipline through new ideas, 

X
2

to be able to comprehend the interaction across various disciplines related to the field of design reaching at original conclusions via using new and complex analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills,

X
3

to be able to develop new strategic approaches to solve unforeseen complex issues in design practice through integrative and creative elaboration,

X
4

to be able to conduct independent research, analyze scientific phenomena through a broad, deep and critical perspective, arrive at new syntheses and evaluations in design discipline,

X
5

to be able to publish scientific articles in reputable refereed journals, present papers in scientific conferences in the field of design and its sub-disciplines,

X
6

to be able to develop effective communication skills to scientifically present and defend original ideas to an expert audience,

X
7

to be able to conduct affective team work in the field of design,

X
8

to be able to use the English language fluently for both comprehending scientific publications and developing proper communication with foreign colleagues,

X
9

to be able to contribute to the process of transforming into an " information society", by following the technological, social and cultural developments on both academic and professional grounds continuously,

X
10

to be able to develop skills of designing and producing unique models and products that will be certificated as registered design, trade mark and patents.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest