BA 565 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Innovation and Creativity
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
BA 565
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The goal is to develop an understanding of innovation processes. The course aims to link theory and practice and thus enabling students to discuss and apply on theories and models of innovation in order to value the applicability and practicality of the concepts introduced during the course is a major objective.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to assess the importance of innovation to individual businesses, the wider economy and society.
  • will be able to discuss the range, scope, and complexity of the phenomena, issues, and problems related to technology innovation management.
  • will be able to identify, critically analyze and discuss the possible connections and synergies between the different theories, models, and concepts.
  • will be able to set contemporary innovation experience against academic theory.
  • will be able to apply critical thinking skills to a variety of different situations (through innovation search assignments).
Course Content This course examines the theory and practice of promoting innovation in startups and existing firms. The main topics include: the workings of the process, managing and organizing innovation in existing firms and building innovative organizations. The course designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how innovative activities of a firm are managed by developing students’ understanding of how firms use innovation and creativity in order to position themselves strategically on the competitive landscape.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction and Course Overview Tidd, J. (2000). “The Competence Cycle: translating knowledge into new products, processes and services”. in Tidd (ed.) From Knowledge Management to Strategic Competence. London: Imperial College Press, pp. 325.
2 What is Innovation? Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 1 Kim, W.C. and Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue Ocean Strategy: from theory to practice. California Management Review, Vol. 47, No. 3, pp 105121.Drejer, A. (2002). Situations for Innovation Management: towards a contingency model. European Journal of Innovation Management, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 417.
3 Sources of Innovation Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 5 Arthur, B. W. (2007). The Structure of Invention. Research Policy, Vol. 36, No.2, pp. 274284.Thomke, S. and von Hippel, E. (2002). Customers as Innovators: a new way to create value. Harvard Business Review, Vol. 80, No. 4, pp. 7481. (2005). Ideas on the Edge. CIO Insight, No. 54, pp. 5460.
4 Innovation Lifecycle and Dominant Design Utterback, J. M. (1996). Mastering the Dynamics of Innovation. Cambridge: Harvard Business School Press, pp. 2355. Anderson, P. and Tushman, M. L. (1990). Technological Discontinuities and Dominant Designs: a cyclical model of technological change. Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 35, No.4, pp. 604633.Markides, C. C. and Geroski,P. A. (2005). Fast Second: how smart companies bypass radical Innovation to enter and dominate New Markets. San Francisco: JosseyBass. pp. 3763. Cooper, A. C. and Smith C.G. (1992). How Established Firms Respond to Threatening Technologies. Academy of Management Executive, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 5570
5 Diffusion of Innovation Hall, B. H. (2005). “Innovation and Diffusion”, in Fagerback, Mowery and Nelson (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Innovation. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 459484.Wilkins, M. (1974). The Role of Private Business in the International Diffusion of Technology. Journal of Economic History, Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 166188.David, P. (1990). The Dynamo and the Computer, American Economic Review, 80(2): 355361.
6 Process Innovation Bessant, J. and Tidd, J. (2007). Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Chichester : John Wiley, pp. 107141.Philips, W. and Noke, H. et al. (2006). Beyond the Steady State: managing discontinuous product and process innovation. International Journal of Innovation Management, Vol. 10, No.2, pp. 175196. Womack, J. P. and Jones, D. T. (1996). Beyond Toyota: how to root out waste and pursue perfection. Harvard Business Review, Vol. 74, No. 5, pp. 140158. Bowen, D. E. and Youngdahl, W. E. (1998). Lean service: in defence of a productionline approach. International Journal of Service Industry Management; Vol. 9 No. 3, pp. 207225. 
7 Product Innovation Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 9Bessant, J. and Francis, D. (1997). Implementing the New Product Development Process. Technovation, Vol. 17, No. 3, pp. 189197.Hauser, J. R. and Clausing, D. (1988). The House of Quality. Harvard Business Review, Vol.3, MayJune
8 Service Innovation Berry, Shankar, Parish, Cadwallader and Dotzel (2006). Creating New Markets through Service Innovation. Sloan Management Review, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 5663. Vermulen, P. and van der Aa, W. (2003). “Organizing Innovation in Services”. in Tidd and Hull (eds.) Service Innovation: Organizational Responses to Technological Opportunities and Market Imperatives, London: Imperial College Press, pp. 3553.
9 Open Innovation Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 6Chesbrough, H. (2006). “Open Innovation: a new paradigm for understanding industrial Innovation” in Chesbrough, Vanhaverbeke and West (eds.), Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 114. Penin, J. (2008). More Open than Open Innovation: rethinking the concept of openness in innovation studies. Working Papers of BETA, ULP, Strasbourg Nelson, R. R. (2004). The Market Economy and the scientific Commons. Research Policy, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp. 455471. Porter, M. E. (1998). Clusters and the New Economics of Commpetition. Harvard Business Review, Vol. 76, No. 6, pp. 7790.
10 Building the Innovation Case Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 7 and 8Genus, A. and Coles, A. M. (2006). Firm Strategies for Risk Management in Innovation. International Journal of Innovation Management, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 113126.Burt, G. and van der Heijden, K. (2003). First Steps: towards purposeful activities in scneario thinking and future studies. Futures, Vol. 35, No. 10, pp. 10111026. Dvir, D. and Lechler, T. (2004). Plans are Nothing, Changing Plans is everything: the impact of changes on project success. Research Policy, Vol. 33, No. 1, pp. 115. Christensen, C.M., Kaufman, S.P. and Shih, W.C. (2008). Innovation Killers: how financial tools destroy your capacity to do new things. Harvard Business Review, Vol.86, No.1, pp. 98105.
11 Building the Innovative Organization Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 3Hargadon, A. and Sutton, R. I. (2000). Building an Innovation Factory. Harvard Business Review, Vol. 78, No. 3, pp. 157167.Chesbrough, H. and Teece, D. (2002). Organizing for Innovation: when is virtual virtuous? Harvard Business Review, Vol. 80, No. 8, pp. 127135. Sharma, A. (1999). Central Dilemmas of Managing Innovation in Large Firms, California Management Review, Vol. 41 No. 3, pp. 146164. Day, G.S. and Schoemaker P.J.H. (2008). Are You a Vigilant Leader. MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 49, No. 3, pp. 4351.Bouwen, R. and Fry, R. (1992), “Organizational Innovation and Learning: Four Patterns of Dialog between the Dominant Logic and the New Logic”, International Studies of Management & Organization, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 3751
12 Coping with Innovation and Making it Happen Delbridge, R. (1995). Surviving JIT: control and resistance in a Japanese transplant. Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 32, No. 6, pp. 803817.Stewart, P. and Garrahan, P. (1995) Employee Responses to New Management Techniques in the Auto Industry. Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 9, No. 3, 517536. Storey, J. and Harrison, A. (1999). Coping with World Class Manufacturing. Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 643664.
13 Innovation and Organizational Learning Joe Tidd and John Bessant, Managing Innovation (4th Edition) Chapter 12Beckman, S. L. and Barry, M. (2007). Innovation as a Learning Process: embedding design thinking, California Management Review, Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 2556.Cohen, W. and Levinthal, D. (1990), Absorptive Capacity: a new perspective on learning and innovation, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 35. Read pages 128138 only. Nonaka, I. and Konno, N., (1998). The concept of Ba: building a foundation for knowledge creation, California Management Review, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 4055.Brusoni, S. and Cassi, L. (2007). ReInventing the Wheel: Knowledge Integration in Fastchanging Environments, KITeS Working Papers 209, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy. Storey, J. and Barnett, E. (2000). Knowledge management initiatives: learning from failure, Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp.145–156.
14 Innovation is SME Context Jones, O. (2003). “Innovation in SMEs: intrapreneurs and new routines” in Jones and Tilley (eds.), Competitive Advantage in SMEs: Organising for Innovation and Change, Chicester: J. Wiley, pp. 135155. Lee, G., Bennett, D. and Oakes I., (2000). Technological and organisational change in small to mediumsized manufacturing companies: a learning organisation perspective. International Journal of Operations & Production Management. Vol. 20, No. 5, pp. 549572.Freel, M. (2000). “Barriers to Product Innovation in Small Manufacturing Firms”. International Small Business Journal, 18 (2), pp. 6080.Lefebvre, L. A., Mason, R., Lefebvre, E. (1997). The Influence Prism in SMEs: the power of CEO’s perceptions on technology policy and its organizational impacts. Management Science, Vol. 43, No. 6, pp. 856878.
15 Presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Above mentioned book chapters, scholarly articles and Powerpoint lecture slides.

Suggested Readings/Materials

Serious business press disseminating rising innovative applications.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
25
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
45
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
55
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
45
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
6
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
208

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to demonstrate general business knowledge and skills.

2

To able to master the state-of-the-art literature in the area of specialization.

3

To be able to evaluate the performance of business organizations through a holistic approach.

4

To be able to effectively communicate scientific ideas and research results to diverse audiences.

5

To be able to deliver creative and innovative solutions to business-related problems.

6

To be able to solve business related problems using analytical and technological tools and techniques.

7

To be able to take a critical perspective in evaluating business knowledge.

8

 

To be able to exhibit an ethical and socially responsible behavior in conducting research and making business decisions.

9

To be able to carry out a well-designed independent and empirical research.

10

To be able to use a foreign language to follow information about the field of finance and participate in discussions in academic environments.        

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest