MCPR 570 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Global Consumer Culture and Identities
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCPR 570
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives In this course we will explore global consumer culture, its articulation with dominant and vernacular cultures in the process of identity constructions
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Learn to examine consumer culture in a global scale in order to understand its impacts in everyday life.
  • Become more aware of how consumerism is connected to broader questions of power and any sorts of identities (local, global, national, cultural, social)
  • Develop a unique set of analytical skills, making them more confident in reading and speaking about complex material and in understanding the relationship between media and consumer culture.
  • Have one of the few opportunities for original primary research at the graduate level.
Course Content Consumerism, among all

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Introduction to theoretical Frameworks, Course Themes, Expectations
2 Construction of the Nation(al) Benedict Anderson. Imagined Communities. "The origins of National Consciousness" pp.37/65
3 Defining and Rethinking Global Arjun Appadurai. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. "Global Ethnoscapes." pp. 48/65
4 Local, Global or Glocal AKA Hybrid 1)Annabelle SrebernyMohammadi. The global and the local in international communications, in Askew, Kelly M. and Richard R. Wilk (Eds.) The Anthropology of Media: A Reader. pp. 337/356. 2)Marwan Kraidy. The Cultural and Political Economies of Hybrid Media Texts, in Hybridity or the Cultural Logic of Globalization. Philadelphia: Temple University Press: 2005. 97/115.
5 Modern Consumer Society Leiss et. al., Late Modern Consumer Society, pp. 295/332.
6 Neoliberal Age Harvey D (2005) A Brief History of Neoliberalism. New York: Oxford University Press. Introduction & Chapter1
7 Consumption, Identities and Nationalism Silvio Waisbord. "Media and the Reinvention of the Nation," in The Sage Handbook of Media Studies, edited by John Downing, 375/392. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications,
8 Consumption, Identities and Advertising Robert Foster. Making National Cultures in the Global Ecumene. Annual Review of Anthropology, 20: 235/60.
9 Glocalization in Advertising :The case of Turkey Christine Ogan, Filiz Cicek, Yesim Kaptan. Reverse Glocalization? Marketing a Turkish Cola in the Shadow of a Giant. Journal of Arab and Muslim Media Research 1(1): 47/62.
10 Midterm Exam Good Luck!
11 Global Brands and Global Images Tinic, Serra (1997) United Colors and United Meanings, Journal of Communication: 3/25.
12 The Advertising Industry William Mazzarella. 'Very Bombay ': Contending with the Global in an Indian Advertising Agency. Cultural Anthropology. 18 (1): 33/71.
13 Race, Ethnicity and Advertising Arlene Davila, Latinos INC. "Don't Panic, I'm Hispanic": The Trends and Economy of Cultural Flows, pp. 23/55.
14 Final Paper Presentations Discussion of Final Paper Topicsand providing feedback
15 Revision & Evaluation of the Semester Deadline: Final Paper Due
16 Summary of the Semester Overall summary of the course and Discussions

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Materials: book chapters and articles, class discussions
Suggested Readings/Materials PRESENTATION:PStudents will be asked to lead a discussion by bringing up insightful questions and to discuss major issues in the article. EXAMS: Three comprehensive short reflection papers and one a longer essay that synthesizes the concepts we have been learning during the semester. There is only one midterm exam. The format and subject matter will be discussed in more detail during the semester.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
30
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
20
Final Exam
1
20
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
8
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
6
Presentation / Jury
1
4
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exam
1
17
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to demonstrate general business knowledge and skills.

2

To able to master the state-of-the-art literature in the area of specialization.

3

To be able to evaluate the performance of business organizations through a holistic approach.

4

To be able to effectively communicate scientific ideas and research results to diverse audiences.

5

To be able to deliver creative and innovative solutions to business-related problems.

6

To be able to solve business related problems using analytical and technological tools and techniques.

7

To be able to take a critical perspective in evaluating business knowledge.

8

 

To be able to exhibit an ethical and socially responsible behavior in conducting research and making business decisions.

9

To be able to carry out a well-designed independent and empirical research.

10

To be able to use a foreign language to follow information about the field of finance and participate in discussions in academic environments.        

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest