MCS 507 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Crossroads in Communication Studies
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 507
Fall
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives • evaluate historical and normative accounts of communication traditions, theories, and models
• examine main research parameters of the communication process: mass media power; mass communication effects; relation between technology/media and society/culture; media organization and production; media reception, media events, new media developments; and, conditions of democracy
• encourage students to reflect on various interdisciplinary approaches and their methodologies
• evaluate historical and normative accounts of communication traditions, theories, and models
• examine main research parameters of the communication process: mass media power; mass communication effects; relation between technology/media and society/culture; media organization and production; media reception, media events, new media developments; and, conditions of democracy
• encourage students to reflect on various interdisciplinary approaches and their methodologies
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop a profound insight into concepts and subjects of the communication and media research field
  • consider the enduring value of diverse methodologies in researching social, technological, cultural and political aspects of the communication process
  • relate different arguments, and respective reactions, to the contexts they have been developed
  • evaluate how theories influence real outcomes in the world
  • demonstrate critical thinking to significant challenges and questions raised by new and hybrid communication and media practices
Course Content The course probes into key paradigmatic approaches of communication and media studies

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Theory Building and Communication McQuail, D. (2010) McQuail’s Mass Communication Theory, 6th edition. London: Sage (part 2). Douglas Kellner. Adventures in Cultural Studies.
3 Fordism and the rise of Mass Society Mattelart, A. & Mattelart, M. (1998) Theories of Communication: a Short Introduction. London: Sage (pp. 5-17) Stuart Ewen. Captains of Consciousness. (pp. 1-19)
4 Early Perspectives in Media Theory Mattelart, A. & Mattelart, M. (1998) Theories of Communication: a Short Introduction. London: Sage (pp. 19-42)
5 Empricism in Media Studies Paul Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton. Mass Communication, Popular Taste and Organised Social Action. 1948
6 Major Themes in Media Theory McQuail, D. (2010) McQuail’s Mass Communication Theory, 6th edition. London: Sage (pp. 68-76, 86-94)
7 First Midterm
8 Models of Communication McQuail, D. (2010) McQuail’s Mass Communication Theory, 6th edition. London: Sage
9 Film Screen
10 Marxist Media Theory Arthur Asa Berger, Marxist Media Analysis, s.32/55.
11 Critical Theory and Frankfurt School David Held. Introduction to Critical Theory. Chapter 3
12 Political Economy of Media Nicholas Garnham. Contribution to a Political Economy of Mass Communication. (pp. 9-32)
13 Cultural Studies and Media Theory Turner, G. 2002. British Cultural Studies: An Introduction.
14 Network Society Sonia Livingstone, 2006. Handbook of New Media. (pp. 1-16)
15 Second Midterm
16 Review of the Semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
10
25
Homework / Assignments
3
45
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
10
2
Homework / Assignments
3
25
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
15
Final Exam
    Total
214

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest