MCS 554 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Space, Identiy and The Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 554
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims at a general understanding of the transformations in everyday culture and macro social, political and cultural processes with regard to their impacts on shifting understanding of time and space, social interaction and identity in the information society.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Elaborate on the relevance of theoretical debates on modernity and postmodernity to the changing context of the information society.
  • Reflect upon the novel experiences of time and space in the global/local contexts of the information society.
  • Situate the issue of power in the dynamic and complex relational template of identity, space and media in the information society.
  • Discuss the transformed context of various identity formations like ethnic, gender, religious and civic in the information society.
  • Discuss the transformed boundary of politics in the information society.
  • Formulate a research problematic with a critical viewpoint and along various theoretical and empirical topics and tools that are provided and discussed within the context of this course.
Course Content How gender, religious, ethnic and civic identities are constructed and represented in the transformed global/local contexts concerning new media technologies constitutes the essential question of the course. The capacities of new social movements and the boundary of politics in these changing circumstances constitute other important issues of the course content.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course
2 Introductory discussion on modernity Marshall Berman, “Introduction: modernity, yesterday, today and tomorrow”, All that is solid melts into air, London: Penguin Books, pp.1536.Anthony D. King, “The times and spaces of modernity”, Spaces of global cultures, London&New York: Routledge, pp.6582. David Harvey, “Giriş”, “ Modernite ve Modernizm”, Postmodernliğin Durumu, Metis Yayınları, 1997, ss. 1555.
3 Introductory discussion on postmodernity Anthony D. King, “Cultures and Spaces of Postcolonial Knowledges” Spaces of global cultures, London&New York: Routledge, pp.4565. David Harvey, “Postmodernizm”, Kentte Postmodernizm”, “Modernleşme”, “POSTmodernİZM mi, postMODERNizm mi?” Postmodernliğin Durumu, Metis Yayınları, 1997, ss. 55143.
4 Time and space in late modernity Anthony D. King, “Interrogating global culture(s)” Spaces of global cultures, London&New York: Routledge, pp.2345.David Harvey “Toplumsal hayatta bireysel mekanlar ve zamanlar”, “Toplumsal iktidar kaynakları olarak zaman ve mekan”, “Aydınlanma projesinin zaman ve mekanı”, “Zamanmekan sıkışması ve modernizmin kültürel bir güç olarak yükselişi”, “Zamanmekan sıkışması ve postmodern durum”, Postmodernliğin Durumu, Metis Yayınları, 1997, 238, 342
5 Global culture and the discussions on post and neocolonialism. Arjun Appadurai, “Disjuncture and difference in the global cultural economy”, “Global ethnoscapes notes and queries on a transnational anthropology”, “Consumption, duration and history”, Modernity at Large, University of Minnesota Press, 1996, ss. 189.
6 The rise of the information society, new media technologies and the shifting context of power relations Manuel Castells, “The net and the self”, “The information technology revolution”, “The new economy: informationalism, globalization, networking”, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture vol.I: The Rise of the Network Society, Blackwell Publishing, 2006, 1147.
7 Identity and meaning in the information society Manuel Castells, “Identity and meaning in the network society”, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, vol.II, The Power of Identity, 2009, 168. .
8 Ethnic identity: time and space in the information society Myria, Georgiou, “Diasporic identities: in difference lies commonality”, Diaspora, Identity and the Media: Diasporic Transnationalism and Mediated Spatialities, New Jersey: Hampton Press, 2006, pp.3969.Gökçen Karanfil, “Pseudoexiles and Reluctant Transnationals: Disrupted Nostalgia on Turkish Satellite Broadcast”, Media Culture and Society, 31:6, 2009.Kevin Robins & Asu Aksoy, “Banal transnationalism: the difference that television makes”, Karim H. Karim (ed.), The Media of Diaspora, London&New York: Routledge, 2003.
9 Gender identity: time and space in the information society Manuel Castells, “The end of patriarchalism: social movements, family, and sexuality in the information age, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, vol.II, The Power of Identity, 2009, pp. 134243.David, F. Shaw, “Gay men and computer communication: a discourse of sex and identity in cyberspace” Steven G. Jones (ed.) Virtual Culture: Identity and Communication in Cybersociety, Sage Publications, 1997, pp. 133145. Ayça Alemdaroğlu ve Neslihan Demirtaş, “Mynet’te Erkeklik Halleri”, Toplum ve Bilim, 101, 2004. 
10 Social movements: time and space in the information society Manuel Castells, “The other face of the earth: social movements against the new global order”, “The greening of self: the environmental movement”, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, vol.II, The Power of Identity, 2009, pp. 68134.
11 Nation state and politics: time and space in the information society Manuel Castells, “A powerless state?”, “Informational politics and the crisis of democracy”, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, vol.II, The Power of Identity, 2009, pp. 243354.Henry A. Giroux, “The Iranian uprisings and the challenge of the new media: rethinking the politics of representation”, Fast Capitalism, 5(2), 2009.Alex Burns and Ben Eltham, “Twitter free Iran: an evaluation of twitter’s role in public diplomacy and information operations in Iran’s 2009 election crisis”, Communications Policy & Research Forum 2009, 19th20th November 2009, University of Technology, Sydney.
12 Presentation of the Term Projects
13 Presentation of the Term Projects
14 Book Review Paul Virilio, Open Sky, Verso, 2008.
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Must readings mentioned in this information sheet.
Suggested Readings/Materials None

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
12
35
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
12
3
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
15
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest