MCS 556 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Globalization, Communication and The New Media Order
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 556
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives a) probe into key dimensions and dynamics of mediated globalization b)present different aspects of: global media production and consumption, the globallocal interplay, and emerging transnational commonalities and identifications c) encourage students to apply theory to practice, reviewing various casestudies along the globalization of media/communication
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • grasp the main perspectives and parameters of the globalization process
  • relate transformations of the media in a globalized world with economic, cultural, social and political processes
  • analyze different types of global media flow and contra-flow
  • evaluate interactions among the global, the national and the local in mediascape
  • critically reflect on the implications of media globalization for the diversity of ‘cultures’
  • formulate complex research questions regarding globalization, media, culture and the very concepts of community and
Course Content This course is designed to introduce students to diverse perspectives, practices and implications of the relationship between globalization and media/communication processes.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Media, Modernity & Orientalism Must reading: West and the Rest: Discourse and Power by Stuart Hall Suggested reading: Pictures from afar: Shooting the Middle East
2 No Class
3 Media & Nationalism Must reading: What is a Nation by Ernest Renan Suggested reading: Anderson, B. (1983) Imagined Communities. London: Verso.
4 Media & Globalization I Must reading: King, Anthony. "Globalisation and Homogenisation: The State of Play." In Homogenisation of Representations, edited by Modjtaba Sadria, 17-34. Geneva: Aga Khan Award for Architecture, 2012. Suggested reading: Sarikakis, K., (2005). ‘Legitimating Domination: Notes on the Changing Faces of Cultural Imperialism’. In Hamm, B. and Smandych, R., (eds.) Cultural Imperialism: Essays on the Political Economy of Cultural Domination. Canada: Broadview Press, pp 80-92
5 Media & Globalization II Must reading: Robertson R (1990) Mapping the global condition: globalization as the central concept. Theory Cult Soc 7:15–30 Suggested reading: Kraidy, M. (2002). Globalization of culture through the media. In J. R. Schement (Ed.), Encyclopedia of communication and information (Vol. 2, pp. 359-363). New York, NY: Macmillan Reference USA.
6 Global Media Ethnography Must reading: Murphy, P.D. and Kraidy, M.M. (2003) Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives. London and New York: Routledge. (pp.3-21). Suggested reading: Murphy, P.D. and Kraidy, M.M. (2003) Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives. London and New York: Routledge. (pp.299-308).
7 First Midterm
8 Conceiving Transnationalism Must Readings: Vertovec, S. (2001) ‘Transnationalism and identity’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 27(4):573-82 Schiller, N. G., (1995). From Immigrant to Transmigrant: Theorizing Transnational Migration, Anthropological Quarterly, 68:1 p.48 Suggested reading: Clifford, James. 1994. Diasporas. Current Anthropology 9.3: 302–338.
9 Transnationalism & Identity Must Reading: Ayhan Kaya (2002) Aesthetics of diaspora: Contemporary minstrels in Turkish Berlin, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 28:1, 43-62 Suggested reading: Soysal, L. (2001). Diversity of experience, experience of diversity, Turkish migrant youth culture in Berlin, Cultural Dynamics, 13(1): 5-28.
10 Transnational Media Flows I Must Reading: Miyase Christensen (2013). TransNational Media Flows: Some Key Questions and Debates. International Journal of Communication 7 (2013), 2400-2418 Suggested reading: Chalaby, J. (2005). From internationalization to transnationalization. Global Media and Communication, 1(1), 28–33.
11 Transnational Media Flows II Must Reading: Aksoy, A. and K. Robins (2003) ‘Banal Transnationalism: The Difference that Television Makes’, pp. 89–104 in K.H. Karim (ed.) The Media of Diaspora. London: Routledge. Suggested reading: Karanfil, G. 2009. Pseudo-exiles and reluctant transnationals: disrupted nostalgia on Turkish satellite broadcasts. Media, culture & society, 31: 887
12 Transnational Media Flows III Must Reading: Kaptan, Yeşim and Gökçen Karanfil (2013), “RTÜK, Broadcasting, and the Middle East: Regulating the Transnational”, International Journal of Communication, 7 (2013), 2322-40. Marwan M. Kraidy & Omar Al-Ghazzi (2013) Neo-Ottoman Cool: Turkish Popular Culture in the Arab Public Sphere, Popular Communication, 11:1, 17-29, Suggested reading: Karanfil, Y. Gökçen and Eğilmez, D. Burcu (2017) "Politics, Culture and Media: Neo-Ottomanism as a Transnational Cultural Policy on TRT El Arabia and TRT Avaz,"Markets, Globalization & Development Review: Vol. 2: No. 2, Article 4.
13 Second Midterm
14 General Discussion
15 Evaluation of the Course
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

1) course textbook 2) lectures (PowerPoint presentations), 3) seminars (thought questions and material for class discussion)

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
10
20
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
,
Oral Exams
Midterm
2
45
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
7
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
10
35
Presentation / Jury
2
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
,
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
25
Final Exam
25
    Total
543

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest