MCS 558 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Film and Visual Theory
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 558
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to develop an advanced understanding of film as a complex visual medium through the study of key theoretical approaches.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop an advanced understanding of film as a complex visual medium through the study of key theoretical approaches to the medium
  • look more deeply at the nature of cinema itself—its social and psychological roles as well as its artistic one—and at the relationship of individual films to the theories they purportedly exemplify.
  • formulate answers to the following questions: Just exactly what is the cinema?, What makes cinema different from other art forms?, Is film a record of reality or a way to alter reality?, What is the “language” of film?, In what sense is film an art?, Who is the artist behind an individual film? ,What is film theory? What is film criticism?, Are movies products of their culture or do they shape that culture?, Are filmgoers therefore actually shaped by what they see?, How do audiences react to and interpret what they see?, Put another way, what is the relationship between filmgoing and visual perception in general?,How do changes in technology affect the nature of film and of spectatorship?
Course Content This course aims to develop an advanced understanding of film as a complex visual medium through the study of key theoretical approaches. Theoretical approaches discussed will include the chief ones, realist theory and formalist theory, as well as their major manifestations—the films themselves—and their major exponents—such important theorists as Kracauer, Bazin, Münsterberg, Arnheim, and Balázs. We will be trying to look more deeply at the nature of cinema itself, its social and psychological roles as well as its artistic one, and at the relationship of individual films to the theories they purportedly exemplify. Particularly in a world where much of the information we receive is visual in nature—where, increasingly, our knowledge about the world is based on the mediated images that we see and not upon firsthand experience—.





ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
+
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 General overview
2 Introductions (Part 1): hand out and discuss syllabus; take attendance; assign reading.
3 Introductions (Part 2) “Overview of Film Theory,” by Louis Giannetti, pp. 496/529.
4 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Italian Neorealism”,FILM: Shoeshine (1946) Review “Overview of Film Theory.”
5 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Proletarian Naturalism”,FILM: La Promesse (The Promise, 1996) “Overview of Film Style,” by Louis Giannetti, pp. 2/10.
6 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Poetic Realism”,FILM: Le Jour se lève (Daybreak, 1939) “Poetic Realism,” by David Cook, pp. 392/396.
7 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Transcendental or Divine Realism”,FILM: Diary of a Country Priest (1951) “Realist Film Theory: Siegfried Kracauer,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 103/133.
8 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Interior or Existential Realism” , FILM: L’eclisse (Eclipse, 1962) Review “Realist Film Theory: Siegfried Kracauer.”
9 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“British Social Realism”,FILM: Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) “Realist Film Theory: André Bazin,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 134/178.
10 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“New American Naturalism”,FILM: Raging Bull (1980) Review “Realist Film Theory: André Bazin.”
11 THE FORMS OF REALISM:“Realism, Iranian Style”,FILM: The White Balloon (1995) Review “Overview of Film Style.”
12 THE STAGES OF FORMALISM:“Russian Formalism”,FILM: Mother (1926) “The Formative Tradition: Sergei Eisenstein,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 11/13, 42/75.
13 THE STAGES OF FORMALISM:“German Expressionism”,FILM: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) “The Formative Tradition: Hugo Münsterberg,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 15/26.
14 THE STAGES OF FORMALISM:“French Surrealism”,FILM: Blood of a Poet (1930) “The Formative Tradition: Rudolf Arnheim,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 27/41.
15 THE STAGES OF FORMALISM:“Cinematicism, or SelfReflexive Cinema”,FILM: Vivre sa vie (My Life to Live, 1962) “The Formative Tradition: Béla Balázs,” by Dudley Andrew, pp. 76/101.
16 THE STAGES OF FORMALISM:“AvantGardism and Abstraction”,Dog Star Man (196164); Ballet méchanique (1924); Rhythmus ’21 (1921) “French AvantGardism,” by David Cook, pp. 377/392; “AvantGarde Film,” by Louis Giannetti, pp. 332/361.

 

Course Notes/Textbooks 1) “ Understanding Movies “,Louis Giannetti 2)Course Pack
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
35
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
50
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
7
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest