MCS 559 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Film Analysis and Criticism
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 559
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This is a course that reviews a set of prominent films in the history of cinema and discusses how to approach them using the tools of film analysis and criticism.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • describe significant approaches to film analysis and criticism
  • discuss films in a critical way
  • compare and contrast various methods of film analysis
  • apply film analysis theories to works of cinema
  • analyze film analysis approaches in terms of their theoretical foundations
Course Content The course aims to teach the students how to conduct film analysis and criticism. Students are expected to submit a paper proposal, do a presentation and hand in a term paper.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course Film and Meaning
2 Making a Movie: Film Production Film Analysis – Theories and Methods Bordwell & Thompson, “Chapter 1: Film as Art. Creativity, Technology, Business” in Film Art, pp. 16-34. Corrigan & White, “Chapter 11: Reading about Film. Critical Theories and Methods” in The Film Experience, pp. 399-423.
3 Early Cinema — between Documentary and Fiction Screening Robert J. Flaherty - Nanook of the North (1922) (83 min) Pages 86-91 from NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema. Oxford Univ. Press. Bill Nichols, “Chapter 5: How Did Documentary Filmmaking Get Started?” in Introduction to Documentary. 2nd edition. Indiana University Press. 2001, pp. 120-141.
4 Early 20th Century Avant-garde Cinema Kinopravda (Cine-truth) Screening Dziga Vertov, The Man with the Movie Camera (1929) (80 min) Yuri Tsivian „Dziga Vertov“ in G. Nowell-Smith. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema. Oxford Univ. Press. Pp. 92-93. Charles Musser „Documentary in the Soviet Union“ in G. Nowell-Smith. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema. Oxford Univ. Press. Pp. 93-94. Five wonderful effects in Man with a Movie Camera... and how they’re still inspiring filmmakers today: https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/five-wonderful-effects-man-movie-camera Seth Feldman (1973) „Cinema Weekly and Cinema Truth“ Sight and Sound. Winter 1973; 43, 1; ProQuest pp. 34-37.
5 Modern Art of Cinema I: Italian Neo-Realism Screening Vittorio de Sica - Ladri di biciclette (1948) (93 min) Richard Winnington, “Bicycle Thieves” Sight and Sound. March 1, 1950; 19, 1; pp. 26-28. Morando Morandini “Italy from fascism to Neo-realism” in G. Nowell-Smith. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema. Oxford Univ. Press. Pp. 353-361. Corrigan & White “Naturalistic Mise-en-scene in Bicycle Thieves” in The Film Experience, pp. 90-91. Corrigan & White “Italian Neorealism” in The Film Experience, pp. 366-367.
6 Modern Art of Cinema II: French New Wave Screening François Truffaut, 400 Blows (1959) (99 min) Dennis Turner “Made in USA: The American Child in Truffaut’s 400 Blows” Film Quarterly. Vol. 12, No. 2, 1984, pp.75-85. David Sterritt “The 400 Blows” Cineaste. Winter 2006, p.64.
7 Writing a Film Analysis Corrigan & White, “Chapter 12: Writing a Film Essay” in The Film Experience, pp. 435-467.
8 The Borders of Documentary and Fiction I Chris Marker, Sans Soleil (1983) (104 min) Paper Proposal due Upload to Blackboard by midnight Terrence Rafferty “Marker changes trains” Sight and Sound; Fall 1984. 53/4, p.284-288. Phillip Lopate “In Search of the Centaur: The Essay-Film” The Threepenny Review, No. 48 (Winter, 1992), pp. 19-22.
9 The Borders of Documentary and Fiction II Abbas Kiarostami, Close-up (1990) (100 min) Ohad Landesman “In The Mix: Reality Meets Fiction in Contemporary Iranian Cinema” Cinéaste, Vol. 31, No. 3 (SUMMER 2006), pp. 45-47. Miriam Rosen “The Camera of Art: An Interview with Abbas Kiarostami” Cinéaste, Vol. 19, No. 2/3, (1992), pp. 38-40.
10 Independent Cinema Screening Jim Jarmusch - Stranger than Paradise (1984) (89 min) Richard Linnett “As American as You Are: Jim Jarmusch and Stranger than Paradise” Cinéaste, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 26-28. Jonathan Rosenbaum “A Gun Up Your Ass: An Interview with Jim Jarmusch” Cinéaste, Vol. 22, No. 2 (1996), pp. 20-23.
11 Psychoanalysis Screening The Love Witch, Anna Biller (2016) Suzanne Barnard “Tongues of Angels: Feminine Structure and Other Jouissance” Reading Seminar XX: Lacan’s Major Work on Love, Knowledge and Feminine Sexuality. State University of New York Press. 2002. Pp.171-185.
12 Feminist film analysis Screening Lucrecia Martel, The Headless Woman (2008) Laura Mulvey “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” Screen, Volume 16, Issue 3, 1975, Pages 6–18.
13 Student Presentations
14 Student Presentations
15 Overview of the Semester Final Paper due
16 Overview of the Semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
23
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
195

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest