MCS 560 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary World Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 560
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To familiarize students with artistic and thematic developments in world cinema during the 1990s.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • analyze the film art of countries around the world, including the United States, and to dissect that art not only in thematic terms but also formal, interdisciplinary ones: i.e., its cinematography, framing, editing, sound, acting, directing, and scripting in their relationship to painting, photography, music, song, architecture, sculpture, drama and theater, narrative, poetry, movement and choreography, mime, and clothing design.
  • discuss various national perspectives and their reactions to the human condition in its psychological, social, political, economic, and religious or transcendental expression.
  • students will develop critical or analytical skill, evaluative ability, and communicative impulse through reading, writing, and talking about films made outside the Hollywood tradition ( including American films made outside the Hollywood tradition)
  • argue broader theoretical and methodological issues concerning ethnic, racial, or religious identity, the representation of gender, the privileging of image over word, and the relationship of politics or even propaganda to art.
Course Content This course will survey developments in world cinema during the 1990s, covering key national as well as international film movements, principal directors, and aesthetic concepts by situating them within broader social, political, and cultural contexts. The course will proceed in roughly chronological (but always comparative or dialectical) fashion and focus on important issues of the period, including the technological advances of the medium and their relationship to film art; the industrio political developments giving rise to particular film movements; the growing prominence of differing national traditions(some of them displaying alternative or oppositional cinematic styles)over and against the commercial dominance of Hollywood; and the rise of film culture together with the legitimization of film as an art and an object of intellectual inquiry.





ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Hand out syllabus and discuss the nature of the course as well as the syllabus itself; take attendance; assign reading.
2 Screening: Kadosh (1999) Director:Amos Gitai Israel Chapter 1 in World Cinema, “Concepts of National Cinema”; reviewessay on Kadosh; Contemporary World Cinema, 61 / 64.
3 Screening: The Apple(1998) Director: Samira Makhmalbaf Iran Chapter 18 in World Cinema, “Issues in World Cinema”; “Writing about Iranian Cinema”; reviewessay on The Apple; Contemporary World Cinema, 82 / 84.
4 Screening: The Match Factory Girl (1989) Director: Aki Kaurismäki, Finland Chapter 6 in World Cinema, “Issues in European Cinema”; reviewessay on The Match Factory Girl.
5 Screening: Prisoner of the Mountains (1996) Director: Sergei Bodrov Russia Chapter 11 in a World Cinema, “ East Cenral European Cinema” ; “ High Infidelity ,”in the coursepack.
6 Screening: Stolen Children (1992) Director: Gianni Amelio Italy Chapter 8 in a World Cinema, “ Italian Postwar Cinema and Neorealism” ; reviewessay on Stolen Children.
7 The Straight Story (1999). Dir. David Lynch, USA “Hollywood in the ’70s & ’80s,” pp. 857879 in David A.Cook, A History of Narrative Film; reviewessay on The Straight Story.
8 Screening: La Promesse(1996) Director:Luc & JeanPierre Dardenne Belgium Chapter 12 in a World Cinema, “European Film Policy and the Response to Hollywood” ; “ High Infidelity."
9 Screening: Secrets and Lies(1996) Director: Mike Leigh England Chapter 14 in a World Cinema, “British Cinema” ; review essay on Secrets and Lies.
10 Ju Dou (1990). Dir. Zhang Yimou, China. Chapter 20 in World Cinema, “Chinese Cinema”; review essay on Juo Dou.
11 Maborosi (1995). Dir. Hirokazu Koreeda, Japan. Chapter 17 in a World Cinema, “Canadian Cinema” ; “ Blood, Cherries and Dust,”in the coursepack.
12 Screening: Ju Dou(1990) Director: Zhang Yimou China Chapter 20 in a World Cinema, “Chinese Cinema” ; “ Love Without Pity,”in the coursepack.
13 Ponette (1996). Dir. Jacques Doillon, France. Review essay on Ponette.
14 Screening, Strawberry and Chocolate (1994). Dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Cuba Chapter 25 in World Cinema, “South American Cinema”; reviewessay on Strawberry and Chocolate.
15 Review
16 Conclusion

 

Course Notes/Textbooks John Hill and Pamela Church Gibson, eds., World Cinema: Critical Approaches (Oxford University Press, 2000): chapters from this book, as well as Shohini Chaudhuri’s Contemporary World Cinema, will be made available in coursepack form. Also included will be selected reviewessays from some of my own books.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
40
Final Exam
1
50
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
47
Final Exam
1
50
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest