MCS 562 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Selected Issues in IMC
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 562
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This is a research and writing based course, which is designed to enable students to be uptodate on the Integrated Marketing Communications issues and concerns that contemporary organizations are dealing with today and in the predictable future. Students will explore a range of contemporary issues facing the marketing communications industry from a theoretical and practical perspective.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define the fundamental marketing communication principles and techniques,evaluate and apply marketing communications principles and techniques within the context of the current issuesdevelop a detailed point of view about a contemporary marketing communications issue and a set of recommendations that practitioners can introduce.
  • have an understanding of alternative marketing communication applications to manage a certain communication issue
  • discuss the relation between marketing communications and consumer by making use of the relevant principles and techniques within this field of studycontribute to development of research process on relevant contemporary topicconduct both secondary and primary researches and evaluate the findings on area of chosen subject.
Course Content This course is a special indepth discussion or is a critical study of theory and research related to advanced topics in IMC. The topics may vary due to the interests/needs of the students and the instructor will determine the specific topics of this course on yearly base regarding with current issues in IMC. Different articles from related journals will also be discussed about relevant IMC topics.




ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course
2 Role of IMC in Marketing
3 Database management in the digital era
4 WOM, Buzz, and Viral Marketing Citizen Marketers: When People Are the Message. Ben McConnell & Jackie Huba. 2007. Pages vii96 (Introduction & Chapters 14; CIT)
5 User Generated Content, User Generated Ads
6 Cause Marketing Daw, J. (2006). Cause marketing for nonprofits: Partner for purpose, passion, and profits. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
7 Social Marketing Safko, L. & Brake, D.K. (2009). The social media bible: Tactics, tools and strategies for business success. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
8 Green Marketing Grant, J. (2008). The green marketing manifesto. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
9 Sports Marketing
10 Guerilla Marketing
11 Mobile Marketing Krum, C. (2010). Mobile marketing: Finding your customers no matter where they are. Indianapolis, IN: Que Publishing.
12 Healthcare Communication & Marketing
13 Project Presentations
14 Project Presentations
15 Project Presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks No required textbook. Instructor will provide weekly reading materials such as book chapters and articles, case studies, papers etc.
Suggested Readings/Materials Available online via electronic information resources International Journal of AdvertisingJournal of Advertising ResearchJournal of the Institute of Public RelationsJournal of Product and Brand ManagementJournal of Marketing CommunicationsEuropean Journal of MarketingJournal of Brand ManagementJournal of Communication ManagementJournal of Database Marketing and Customer Strategy Management

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
13
25
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
8
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
13
2
Presentation / Jury
1
3
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest