MCS 563 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Semiotics, Psychoanalysis and Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 563
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This unit will provide the students with advanced knowledge of the major methods of film analysis and criticism
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • explain the trajectory of methodological development in the fields of film analysis and criticism
  • compare different analytic and critical approaches regarding their ability to respond to the questions that arise during the analysis of filmic works
  • evaluate the historical and contemporary relevance of different academic disciplines, including linguistics/semiology, philosophy, sociology, political science and psychoanalysis, to the critical and analytic film studies
  • explain the processes of production of the meaning and the construction of narrative in cinema as a combination of textual and audiovisual elements
  • interpret the relations between the auteur, film and the audience according to different theories of production/narratology, representation/discourse and psychoanalysis/subjectivity
  • develop a comparative insight into the theoretical reflections on different currents and notions of film studies, including realism, auteur cinema and open text
  • analyze the relations between cinema and cultural hegemony in their relevance to the major topics of sociological, political and ideological research, including class, gender, race, ethnicity, East/West, etc.
Course Content This course combines the theoretical/methodological literature of cultural studies with critical and analytic film studies.




ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and an overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation. Lehman & Luhr, Thinking About Movies, Burgoyn et.al., New Vocabularies in Film Semiotics
2 Introduction: Problematizing the Cinema Thinking… Introduction pp. 116, Screening: Fatal Attraction
3 Narrative Structure: What is a Film About? Thinking… Ch.2 pp. 17 37, New Vocabularies … Ch. 3 pp. 69122, Screening: Trailers and selected scenes from Jurassic Park and Rashamon)
4 Authorship Thinking Ch 4 pp. 6079, Screening: Trailers and selected scenes from Murder, My Sweet and The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral)
5 Genre Thinking Ch 5 pp. 8098, Screening: Trailers and selected scenes from The Searchers and Jungle Fever)
6 Series, Sequels and Remakes Thinking Ch 6 pp. 99117, Screening: Trailers and selected scenes from Scarface 1932 & 1983 and Goldfinger
7 Actors and Stars Thinking Ch 7 pp. 118135, Screening: Trailers and selected scenes from Unforgiven and Morocco
8 Semiotics: the Sign and the Structure New Vocabularies … Ch.1 pp. 127, A. AsaBerger, ‘Semiotic Analysis, Media Analysis Techniques, 142, Terry Eagleton, ‘Structuralism and Semiotics’, from Literary Theory, Thinking… Ch.2 pp. 3859, Screening: Trailers and selected sceenes from Rules of the Game and Mr. Hulot’s Holiday)
9 CineSemiology New Vocabularies … Ch.2 pp. 2868, Stuart Hall, From Language to Culture: Linguistics to Semiotics (pp. 3641)
10 Review of the Semester  
11 Review of the Semester  
12 Review of the Semester  
13 Review of the Semester  
14 Review of the Semester  
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Must readings given in this information sheet.
Suggested Readings/Materials None

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
2
60
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
41
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
20
Final Exam
    Total
225

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest