MCS 564 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Discourse Analysis
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 564
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
8

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To introduce students to the many approaches and applications of discourse analysis.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to discuss various approaches to discourse analysis.
  • Will be able to discuss different approaches and their inherent advantages and disadvantages.
  • Will be able to apply a spectrum of approaches to a wide variety of actual media artefacts
  • Will be able to write about the wider political, social and economic implications of discourses uncovered through analysis in both a Turkish and global sense.
  • Will be able to reveal implicit and explicit discourses which promote and/or hinder democratic ideals.
Course Content This course examines discourse analysis, focussing on Critical Discourse analysis and its many approaches such as social actors, discoursehistorical, and multimodal approaches. The course will apply these approaches to a wide variety of media artefacts from popular cinema to local radio news to global television and internet news services. The course will concentrate on wider political, economic and social implications of discourses uncovered through analysis such as the perpetuation of racism, sexism, nationalism and consumerism.




ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and an overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation. Discuss: What is Discourse?
2 What is ideology, power and discourse? What is critical discourse analysis – theoretical context. Analysis: Arka Sokaklar and the Simpsons. Simpson and Mayr (2010) pp. ABC1, Williams (1976), Thompson (1990), Wodak (2001), Fowler (1996), Richardson (2007)
3 Discourse and race/ gender:Representation of social actors. Presentation on Caldas-Coulthard (1994) reported speech and gender. Analysis: music lyrics. Review Simpson and Mayr (2010) ABC and D5 and Van Leeuwen (1996), van Dijk (2000)
4 Discourse and race/ gender: van Dijk. Presentation on Paul Baker & Amanda Potts (2013). Analysis: Samoli pirates representations in BBC news. Read van Leeuwen and Wodak (1999), Way 2013, Lazar (2000), Machin and Thornborrow (2006)
5 Discourse and nationalism: Banal nationalism. Presentation: Bishop and Jawarski (2003) Analysis: James Bond and TV news story. Way and Akan (2016), Bishop and Jaworski (2003), Higgins (2004)
6 Discourse and nationalism: Turkey and Cyprus. Presentation on Way and Akan (2012). Analysis: Turkish newspapers. Chouliaraki (2000), Way (2011)
7 Social semiotics Social actors analysis, Presentation on Martin J. Power, Aileen Dillane & Eoin Devereux (2012):Morrissey David Machin (2013) What is multimodal critical discourse studies?, Critical Discourse Studies, 10:4, 347-355
8 The discourse of institutions and organisations. Presentation on Abousnnouga and Machin (2010). Analysis: Arka Sokaklar and the Bill Abousnnouga and Machin (2010), Mayr (2009), Simpson and Mayr (2010) ABC2
9 Discourse and politics in popular music. Presentation: McKerrell (2012) Van Leeuwen (2012), Way (2013)
10 Nationalism and the role of colour in multimodal analysis. Presentation on van Leeuwen (2000) visual racism. Analysis: Black Hawk Down. Van Leeuwen and Machin (2005), Barrett (2017)
11 Discourse and advertising: Multi-modal analysis. Presentation on Machin and Niblock (2008). Analysis: the Leicester Mercury newspaper. Machin (2007), Simpson and Mayr (2010) A,B,C,D 8.
12 Discourse and politics. Presentation for Graham et.el. (2004). Discourse and Globalisation. Analysis: Beneton advertising campaign. Simpson and Mayr (2010) A,B,C,D 10. Hansen and Machin (2008), Fairclough (2001), Simpson and Mayr (2010) A, B, C, D 9
13 Final presentations
14 Final presentations
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Lecture and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
10
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
30
Presentation / Jury
1
60
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
40
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
60
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
20
Presentation / Jury
1
50
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
228

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest