MCS 565 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
The Political Economy of Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 565
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide the students with the methodological framework and analytical tools to apply theory in media industries.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Analyze the factors that affect media markets
  • Identify the forces determining corporate strategies
  • Develop criteria of evaluation of economic performance
  • Interpret the trends affecting media industries
  • Assess the dynamics of the changing media system and compare different theoretical perspectives
Course Content This course will start with a theoretical and empirical analysis of media markets and companies. A number of case studies will be examined in detail. The changing characteristics of media industries and the underling factors will be discussed. Moreover developments affecting the interaction between media users, advertisers and producers will be analyzed.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Media economics as a field of study • Owers, J., Carveth, R. and Alexander, A. (2004) “An Introduction to Media Economics Theory and Practice”, in Alexander, A., Owers, J., Carveth, R., Hollifield, A. and Greco A. (ed.) Media Economics. Theory and Practice. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. • Albarran, A. (1996) Media Economics: Understanding Markets, Industries and Concepts. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press. • Herman, E. and Chomsky, N. (1988) Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of Mass Media. New York: Pantheon.
2 Corporate goals and strategies • Doyle, G. (2002). Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage Publications • Thompson, A. and Strickland, A. (2001). Strategic Management. Concepts and Cases. New York: McGraw – Hill. • Porter, M. (1985). Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance. New York: Free Press.
3 Performance and financial ratios • Picard, R. (2002). The Economics and Financing of Media Companies. New York: Fordham University Press. • Harrington, D. (1993) Corporate Financial Analysis. Homewood, IL: Business One Irwin.
4 The development of large media firms • Knee, J., Greenwald, B. and Seave, A. (2009) The Curse of the Mogul. What’s Wrong with the World’s Leading Media Companies. New York: Portfolio. • ChanOlmsted, S. and Chang B. (2003) “Diversification Strategy of Global Media Conglomerates: Examining Its Patterns and Determinants”. Journal of Media Economics, 16(4), pp. 213233. • Herman, E. and McChesney, R. (1997). The Global Media: The New Missionaries of Corporate Capitalism. London: Cassell.
5 Concentration of ownership and pluralism • Commission of the European Communities (2007) Media Pluralism in the Member States of the European Union. Commission Staff Working Document, SEC(2007) 32. Brussels: Commission of the European Communities. http://ec.europa.eu/informationsociety/mediataskforce/doc/pluralism/mediapluralismswpen.pdf • Doyle, G. (2002) Media Ownership. London: Sage Publications.
6 Case studies I: workshop
7 Media institutions and the production process • Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (2009) The Changing Newsroom. http://www.journalism.org/sites/journalism.org/files/PEJThe%20Changing%20Newspaper%20Newsroom%20FINAL%20DRAFTNOEMBARGOPDF.pdf • Kung, L., Leandros, N., Picard, R., Schroeder, R. and van der Wurff, R. (2008) “The Impact of the Internet on Media Organization Strategies and Structures”, in Kung, L., Picard, R. and Towse, R. (ed.) The Internet and the Mass Media. London: Sage. • Hamilton, J. (2004) All the News That’s Fit to Sell. How the Market Transforms Information into News. Princeton: Princeton University Press
8 Case studies II: workshop
9 The dual nature of media markets • Doyle, G. (2002). Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage Publications • Picard, R. (2002). The Economics and Financing of Media Companies. New York: Fordham University Press
10 Industry analysis I: print media • Meyer, Ph. (2009) The Vanishing Newspaper. Columbia: University of Missouri Press • Picard, R. (2004) “The Economics of the Daily Newspaper Industry”, in Alexander, A., Owers, J., Carveth, R., Hollifield, A. and Greco A. (ed.) Media Economics. Theory and Practice. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
11 Industry analysis II: broadcast media • Open Society Institute (2008) Television across Europe. More Channels less Independence. Budapest Open Society Institute • Doyle, G. (2002). Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage Publications
12 Industry analysis III: internet and the new media • Pavlik, J. (2008) Media in the Digital Age. New York: Columbia University Press. • Cardoso, G. (2006) The Media in the Network Society. Lisbon: Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology.
13 Project presentations
14 Project presentations
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks See above.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
35
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
15
Final Exam
1
50
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
60
Presentation / Jury
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
20
Final Exam
1
30
    Total
218

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest