MCS 566 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
IMC Principles and Practices
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 566
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of the course is to introduce graduate students to the principles and practices of integrated marketing communication. Through out the semester it is aimed to provide a theoretical perspective to the emergence of IMC and critically consider the concept in the light of debates related with its development, implementation and evaluation.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Having completed this course the student is expected to be able to;
  • Explain the fundamental integrated marketing communication principles.
  • Assess the factors that underlie the development of IMC approach.
  • 3) explain how each of the communication elements contributes to the IMC whole
  • Explain how each of the communication elements contributes to the IMC whole
  • Examine the process by which integrated marketing communications programs are planned
Course Content This course is an in-depth discussion and a critical study of principles and practices related to the topics in IMC. After examining the fundamentals of IMC, the process of developing an IMC program will be introduced.\nDifferent articles from related journals will also be discussed about relevant IMC topics.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course Philip J. Kitchen, Joanne Brignell, Tao Li And Graham Spickett Jones (2004). The Emergence of IMC: A Theoretical Perspective. Journal of Advertising Research, 44 , pp 19-30 doi:10.1017/S0021849904040048
2 Role of IMC in Marketing Edwina Luck & Jennifer Moffatt (2009): IMC: Has anything really changed? A new perspective on an old definition, Journal of Marketing Communications, 15:5, 311-325
3 Basics of IMC
4 The Impact of IMC on marketing communication
5 The IMC mix I (advertising and PR)
6 The IMC mix II (sales promotion, direct marketing, personal selling)
7 The Role of New Media in IMC Frank Mulhern (2009): Integrated marketing communications: From media channels to digital connectivity, Journal of Marketing Communications, 15:2-3, 85-101
8 Ethical Issues in IMC David Pickton and Amanda Broderick, (Sep 2004) Integrated Marketing Communications 2nd Ed., Financial Times/ Prentice Hall. pp. 288-309
9 IMC Campaign Planning
10 Measurement and evaluation in IMC T. Reinold & J. Tropp (2012): Integrated marketing communications: How can we measure its effectiveness?, Journal of Marketing Communications, 18:2, 113-132 Michael T. Ewing (2009): Integrated marketing communications measurement and evaluation, Journal of Marketing Communications, 15:2-3, 103-117
11 Presentation
12 Guest Speaker
13 Regulation and Legal Issues in IMC Kathy R. Fitzpatrick, (2005). The Legal Challenge of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC): Integrating Commercial and Political Speech Journal of Advertising , Vol. 34, No. 4, Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC), pp. 93-102
14 Presentation
15 Presentation
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks No required textbook. Instructor will provide weekly reading materials such as book chapters and articles, case studies, papers etc.
Suggested Readings/Materials Available online via electronic information resources, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Advertising Research, Journal of the Institute of Public Relations, Journal of Product and Brand Management\\nJournal of Marketing Communications,European Journal of Marketing\\nJournal of Brand Management, Journal of Communication Management, Journal of Database Marketing and Customer Strategy Management.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
2
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
1
35
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
8
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
4
Project
2
15
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
1
    Total
210

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest