MCS 567 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Digital Media Theory and Practice
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 567
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course provides the students with the theories and necessary skills to design research in the broad field of digital media.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to develop a critical understanding of digital media and analyze their indications within the society,
  • demonstrate literacy skills relevant to the forms of digital media,
  • deconstruct and construct digital media texts,
  • conduct research and make appropriate use of necessary tools in the analysis of new media artefacts,
  • develop and use digital media methods in their research projects.
Course Content A wide variety of issues including new media technologies and their influences on the society, dynamics of online media, and networks are covered. Both theoretical and practical aspects of these issues are discussed in the context of digital media.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 New media, new technologies Manovich L. (2002). The Language of New Media. MIT Press, pp. 18-49; Williams, R. (1974). Television: Technology and Cultural Form. Routledge, pp. 289-300.
3 Trends in new media research Kim, S. T., & Weaver, D. H. (2002). Communication research about the Internet: A thematic meta-analysis. New Media & Society, 4(4), 518–538; Tufekci Z. (2008) GROOMING, GOSSIP, FACEBOOK AND MYSPACE, Information, Communication & Society, 11:4, 544-564.
4 Culture of connectivity van Dijck, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 3-23.
5 Disassembling platforms, reassembling sociality Gillespie, T. (2010). The politics of ‘platforms.’ New Media & Society, 12(3), 347–364; Plantin, J.-C., Lagoze, C., Edwards, P. N., & Sandvig, C. (2018). Infrastructure studies meet platform studies in the age of Google and Facebook. New Media & Society, 20(1), 293–310; van Dijck, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 24-44.
6 Project proposal presentations -
7 Facebook van Dijck, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 45-67; Theocharis, Y., & Quintelier, E. (2016). Stimulating citizenship or expanding entertainment? The effect of Facebook on adolescent participation. New Media & Society, 18(5), 817–836.
8 Twitter van Dijck, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 68-88; Bastos, M. T., & Mercea, D. (2016). Serial activists: Political Twitter beyond influentials and the twittertariat. New Media & Society, 18(10), 2359–2378; Marwick, A. E., & boyd, danah. (2011). I tweet honestly, I tweet passionately: Twitter users, context collapse, and the imagined audience. New Media & Society, 13(1), 114–133.
9 Big data, critical questions boyd, D. & Crawford, K. (2012). Critical Questions for Big Data, Information, Communication & Society, 15:5, 662-679; Vargo, C. J., Guo, L., & Amazeen, M. A. (2018). The agenda-setting power of fake news: A big data analysis of the online media landscape from 2014 to 2016. New Media & Society, 20(5), 2028–2049.
10 New media and politics Couldry, N. (2012). Media, society, world: Social theory and digital media practice. Cambridge: Polity, pp.108-133; Laia J. & Bruce B. (2012). Digital Media and Political Engagement Worldwide. In E. Anduiza, M. J. Jensen & L. Jorba (Eds.) Cambridge University Press, 16-38.
11 New media activism Bennett, W. L. & Segerberg, A. (2012). The Logic of Connective Action, Information, Communication & Society, 15:5, 739-768; Doğu, B. (2017): Environment as Politics: Framing the Cerattepe Protest in Twitter, Environmental Communication.
12 Networks John Krinsky & Nick Crossley (2014) Social Movements and Social Networks: Introduction, Social Movement Studies, 13:1, 1-21.
13 Project work presentations
14 Project work presentations
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

A compilation of readings

Suggested Readings/Materials

Handouts, lectures, and online tools for research

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
10
20
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
2
30
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
-
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
10
2
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
2
6
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
200

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

X
12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest