MCS 568 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Alternative Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 568
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives • explore the history, perspectives, definitions, and the social agents of alternative media practices • examine different alternative media paradigms: underground press, community broadcasting, video activism, graffiti and jamming, electronic projects, social media • encourage students to probe into alternative media projects, addressing social, cultural, and political aspects of their practice
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop a critical approach to mass communication process and mass media
  • consider alternative ways of producing, organizing, and be engaged with/in media
  • reflect on differing alternative media projects across various communication areas/sectors
  • evaluate cultural, social, economic and political implications of the practice of alternative media by diverse social actorsun by different social actors
  • research the implementation of alternative practices in communication/media contexts they are interested in
  • apply new methodological approaches in the assessment of alternative media/communication practices
Course Content This module probes into traditional and newer alternative media/communication practices and the contexts of their implementation

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Critical reflections on mass media and mass communication Compulsory readings: - Chomsky, N. (1997) “What makes mainstream media mainstream”, in Z Magazine, available at: http://www.chomsky.info/articles/199710--.htm - Couldry, N. and Curran, J. (eds.) (2003) Contesting Media Power: Alternative Media in a Networked World. Lenham: Rowman and Littlefield – Introduction Recommended readings: - Schiller, H. (1989) Culture Inc. The Corporate Takeover of Public Expression. Oxford: OUP – chapter 7. - McQuail, D. (1995) “Western European media: the mixed model under threat”, in Downing, J., Mohammadi, A. and Sreberny-Mohammadi, A. (eds.) Questioning the Media: a Critical Introduction (2nd ed.). London: Sage. - Davis, A. (2003) “Whither mass media and power? Evidence for a critical elite theory alternative”, Media, Culture and Society, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 669-690.
3 Alternative to what? Definitions & Perspectives Compulsory readings: - Atton, C. (2002) Alternative Media. London: Sage – chapter 1 - Bailey, O. G., Cammaerts, B. and Carpentier, N. (2008) Understanding Alternative Media. Berkshire: Open University Press – chapter 1 Recommended readings: - Atton, C. and Couldry, N. (2003) “Introduction|” (Special Issue on Alternative Media), in Media, Culture and Society, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 625-645. - Hamilton, J. (2000) “Alternative Media: Conceptual Difficulties, Critical Possibilities”, in Journal of Communication Inquiry, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 357-378. - Vatikiotis, P. (2005) “Communication Theory & Alternative Media”, in WPCC, Vol. 2, Issue: 1. http://www.westminster.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/20187/002WPCC-Vol2-No1-Pantelis_Vatikiotis.pdf
4 Underground press Compulsory readings: - Comedia (1984) “The Alternative Press: The Development of Underdevelopment”, in Media Culture and Society, vol. 6, pp. 95-102. - Khiabany, G. (2000) “Red Pepper: a New Model for the Alternative Press?”, in Media, Culture and Society, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 447-463. Recommended readings: - Atton, C. (1999) “A reassessment of the Alternative Press”, in Media, Culture & Society, 21.1: 51-76. - Downing, J. (2000) Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social Movements. CA: Sage (Samizdat in the former Soviet Union). - Lewes, J. (2000) The Underground Press in America (1964-1968): Outlining an Alternative, the Envisioning of an Underground, in Journal of Communication Inquiry, 24:4, pp. 379-400
5 Community radio Compulsory readings: - Lewis, P. (1984) “Community Radio: The Montreal Conference and after”, in Media, Culture and Society, vol. 6, pp. 137-150. - Dunaway, David (1998) “Community radio at the beginning of the 21st century”, in The Public/Javnost 5.2, 87-103 Recommended readings: - Barlow, W. (1988) “Community Radio in the US: The Struggle for a Democratic Medium”, in Media, Culture and Society, vol. 19, pp. 81-105. - Coyer, K., Dowmunt, T. and Fountain, A. (2007) The Alternative Media Handbook. London: Routledge – chapter 2 - Prehn, O. (1992) “From Small Scale Utopianism to Large Scale Pragmatism. Trends and Prospects for Community Orientated Local Radio and Television”, in Jankowski, N., Prehn, O. and Stappers, J. (eds.) The People’s Voice: Local Radio and Television in Europe. London: John Libbey.
6 Participatory video and access TV Compulsory readings: - Coyer, K., Dowmunt, T. and Fountain, A. (2007) The Alternative Media Handbook. London: Routledge – chapter 3 - Stein, L. (1998) “Democratic ‘Talk’, Access Television and Participatory Political Communication”, in The Public, vol. 5 (2), pp. 21-34. Recommended readings: - Freedman, E. (2000) Public Access/Private Confession: Home Video as (Queer) Community Television, in Television & New Media, Vol.1, No.2, pp. 179-190. - Rodriguez, C. (2001) Fissures in the Mediascape: An International Study of Citizens’ Media. Cresskil, New Jersey: Hampton Press – chapter 5 ('Colombian women producing video stories') - Kuttab, D. (1993) “Palestinian Diaries: Grass Roots TV Production in the Occupied Territories”, in Dowmunt, Tony (ed.) Channels of Resistance: global television and local empowerment. London: British Film Institute.
7 Tactics of cultural resistance graffiti, jokes, street theatre, culture jamming Compulsory readings: - Downing, J. (2000) Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social Movements. CA: Sage - chapter 4 - Bailey, O. G., Cammaerts, B. and Carpentier, N. (2008) Understanding Alternative Media.Berkshire: Open University Press – chapter 10 Recommended readings: - Couldry, N. (2001a) “The Umbrella Man: Crossing a Landscape of Speech and Silence”, in European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 131-153. - Bruner, M. L. (2005). Carnivalesque Protest and the Humorless State. Text & Performance Quarterly, 25(2), 136-155 - Garcia, D. and Lovink, G. (1997) The ABC of tactical media, accessed at: http://www.nettime.org/Lists-Archives/nettime-l-9705/msg00096.html
8 Project A
9 Computing practices -Electronic democratic projects -Hacking Compulsory readings: - Lievrouw, L. (2011) Alternative and Activist Media. Cambridge: Polity Press – chapter 4 - Friedland, L. A. (1996) “Electronic democracy and the new citizenship”, Media, Culture and Society, vol. 18, pp. 185-212 Recommended readings: - Bryan, C., Tsagarousianou, R. and Tambini, D. (1998) “Electronic Democracy and the Civic Networking Movement in Context”, in Tsagarousianou, R., Tambini, D. and Bryan, C. (eds.) Cyberdemocracy: Technology, Cities and Civic Networks. London: Routledge. - Jordan, T. (2008) Hacking. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press - chapter 6 - Wark, M. (2004) A Hacker Manifesto. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press – (‘Hacking’)
10 Online Practices -Digital Storytelling -Participatory journalism Compulsory readings: - Atton, C. (2004) An Alternative Internet: Radical Media, Politics and Creativity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press chapter 2 - Lambert, J. (2012) Digital Storytelling, Capturing Lives, Creating Community, 3rd ed. Berkeley, CA: Digital Dinner Press - chapter 10 Recommended readings: - Downing, J. (2003) “The Independent Media Center Movement and the Anarchist Socialist Tradition”, in Couldry, N. and Curran, J. (eds.) Contesting Media Power: Alternative Media in a Networked World. London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers - Couldry N (2008) Mediatization or mediation? Alternative understandings of the emergent space of digital storytelling. In New Media & Society, 10(3): 373–391. - Fuchs, C. (2013) Social Media: A Critical Introduction. London: Sage – chapter 3
11 Commons knowledge -Wikies -Crowdsourcing Compulsory readings: - Lievrouw, L. (2011) Alternative and Activist Media. Cambridge: Polity Press – chapter 6 - Fuchs, C. (2013) Social Media: A Critical Introduction. London: Sage – chapter 10 Recommended readings: - Baker, N. (2008) “The charms of Wikipedia”, in New York Review of Books, March 20, pp. 6-10 - Firer-Blaess, S. And Fuchs, C. (2012) “Wikipedia: an Info-Communist Manifesto”, in Television & New Media, XX(X), pp.1-17. - Terranova, T. (2000) “Free Labor: Producing Culture for Digital Economy”, in Social Text 63, vol.8. no.2, pp. 33-58
12 Activism -Anti-globalization movement Online revolutions Compulsory readings: - Carroll, W. & Hackett, R. (2006) ‘Democratic media activism through the lens of social movement theory’, in Media Culture & Society, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 83–104 - Hands, J. (2011) @ is for Activism: Dissent, Resistance and Rebellion in a Digital Culture. NY: Pluto - chapter 7 Recommended readings: - Bennett, W. L. (2003), ‘New media power. The Internet and Global Activism’, in Couldry, N., Curran, J. (eds) Contesting Media Power: Alternative Media in a Networked World, Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 17-37 -Bennett, W. L. and Segerberg, A. (2012) The logic of connective action: Digital media and the personalization of contentious politics. In Information, Communication and Society, 15(5), 739-768. - Sullivan, A. (2009) “The Revolution will be Twitted”, The Atlantic, accessed at: http://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/print/2009/06/the-revolution-will-be-twittered/200478/ & - Gladwell, M. (2010) ‘Small change: why the revolution will not be tweeted’, The New Yorker, 4 accessed at: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/10/04/101004fa_fact_gladwell
13 Blurring realms? public/private, commercial/civic, individual/collective, deliberative/non-deliberative Compulsory readings: - Papacharissi Z (2009) The virtual sphere 2.0: the internet, the public sphere and beyond. In Chadwick A and Howard P (eds) Routledge Handbook of Internet Politics. New York: Routledge, 230-245. - Dahlgren P (2009) Media and Political Engagement: Citizens, Communication and Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press - chapter 3 Recommended readings: - Carpentier N (2011/2012) The concept of participation. If they have access and interact, do they really participate? In revista Fronteiras - estudos midiáticos, 14(2): 164-177. - Lash S (2009) Afterword: In praise of the a posteriori: Sociology and the Empirical. In European Journal of Social Theory, 12(1): 175-187. - Melucci, A. (1996) The Playing Self: Person and Meaning in the Planetary Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press - chapter 3
14 Project B
15 Review
16 Review

 

Course Notes/Textbooks -course handout -lectures (PowerPoint presentations), -seminars (thought questions and material for class discussion) -workshops (case studies, role plays) sessions
Suggested Readings/Materials - Bibliography - Print Journals - Open Access Journals

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
13
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
1
26
Project
1
23
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
202

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

X
11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

X
12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest