FFD 653 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Historical Avant-Gardes: Architecture and Art
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
FFD 653
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This graduate seminar provides a critical review of the impact on the urban scene in the 1920s and 1930s of radically innovative movements in the arts, especially but not only in architecture, associated at the time and subsequently with the avant-garde.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to critically analyze the emergence of new representation techniques in art and architecture in the early 20th century.
  • Student will be able to have knowledge about the social and political context behind avant-garde art and architectural movements.
  • Student will be able to comparatively examine the avant-garde movements in and outside Europe.
  • Student will be able to approach the historical avant-gardes from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  • Student will be able to comparatively analyze the connection between conceptual utopian projects and realized avant-garde architectural and urban projects.
Course Content The course discusses major avant-garde movements in the history of art and architecture, the invention of new art techniques that have altered perceptions of reality, the influences of the reduction of art to a “black square,” utopian city designs, and the idea of “anti-art.”

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course Themes
2 What is Avant-Garde Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
3 Avant-Garde Art Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
4 Modernism and Modernity Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
5 Avant-Garde in Architecture Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
6 New Discoveries in Representation: Avant-Garde Art Submission of term paper outline and annotated bibliography
7 Manifesto and Avant-Garde Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
8 Presentation Presentation
9 Today's Avant-Garde: Architecture Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
10 Today's Avant-Garde: Architecture Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
11 Today's Avant-Garde: Art Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
12 Today's Avant-Garde: Art Doing the reading and filling out the related worksheet
13 Presentation and discussion of term paper Presentation of 10-page term papers
14 Presentation and discussion of term paper Presentation of 10-page term papers
15 Presentation and discussion of term paper Presentation of 10-page term papers
16 Overall Evaluation / Term Paper Submission No preparation

 

Course Notes/Textbooks None
Suggested Readings/Materials Richard Sennett, Flesh and Stone: The Body and the City in Western Civilization, New York, London: W.W. Norton&Company, 1994; Christian Norberg-Schulz, Principles of Modern Architecture, London: Andreas Papadakis Publisher, 2000; Marshal Berman, All That is Solid Melts into Air, The Experience of Modernity, London, New York, Penguin Books, 1988; Edward Timms and David Kelley (eds.) Unreal City: Urban Experience in Modern European Literature and Art, Manchester University Press, 1985; James Holston, The Modernist City: An Anthropological Critique of Brasilia, Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1989; Hilde Heynen, Architecture and Modernity, a Critique, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2000; Theda Shapiro, Painters and Politics: The European Avant-Garde and Society, 1900-1925, New York: Elsevier, 1976; Anthony Vidler, Warped Space: Art, Architecture, and Anxiety in Modern Culture, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2001; Vikramaditya Prakash, Chandigarh's Le Corbusier: The Struggle for Modernity in Postcolonial India, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002; Anthony D. King. Spaces of Global Cultures: Architecture, Urbanism, Identity, New York: Routledge, 2004.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
20
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
20
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
10
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
208

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

to be able to develop scientific expertise and capabilities in the field of design studies by using creative and critical thinking as well as research skills; innovatively contributing to the discipline through new ideas, 

2

to be able to comprehend the interaction across various disciplines related to the field of design reaching at original conclusions via using new and complex analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills,

3

to be able to develop new strategic approaches to solve unforeseen complex issues in design practice through integrative and creative elaboration,

4

to be able to conduct independent research, analyze scientific phenomena through a broad, deep and critical perspective, arrive at new syntheses and evaluations in design discipline,

5

to be able to publish scientific articles in reputable refereed journals, present papers in scientific conferences in the field of design and its sub-disciplines,

6

to be able to develop effective communication skills to scientifically present and defend original ideas to an expert audience,

7

to be able to conduct affective team work in the field of design,

8

to be able to use the English language fluently for both comprehending scientific publications and developing proper communication with foreign colleagues,

9

to be able to contribute to the process of transforming into an " information society", by following the technological, social and cultural developments on both academic and professional grounds continuously,

10

to be able to develop skills of designing and producing unique models and products that will be certificated as registered design, trade mark and patents.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest