FFD 660 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Western Intellectual History
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
FFD 660
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of the course is to study the intellectual history and development of ideas starting from Renaissance to the beginning of 19th century.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to participate in the academic discussion about western intellectual history
  • Will be able to have an insight in the western intellectual history
  • Will be able to get to know western intellectual history’s main contributors
  • Will be able to observe the influence of events on ideas.
  • Will be able to observe the influence of ideas on events.
Course Content This course is interested in the whole spectrum of the mind and the ideas of different fields. It is not confined to ideas only in politics or in philosophy. It gives more attention to the ideas of science, to the movements of literary style, and to the innovations of the arts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course None
2 Leonardo and his times/ Machiavelli Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Chapter 1-3/ Perennial Press.
3 Thomas More/ Erasmus and the humanists Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 4-5/ Student Proposals
4 The Reformation/ The Scientific Revolution Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 6-7/ Student Proposals
5 The Elizabethan Age Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 8/ Student Proposals
6 The Puritan Revolution Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 9 / Student Proposals
7 The Royal Society/ Hobbes and Locke Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 10-11/ Student Proposals
8 Decartes/ Pascal and Bayle Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 12-13 / Student Proposals
9 Voltaire/ Montesquieu/Rousseau Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 14-15-16/ Student Proposals
10 Midterm reports None
11 The Industrial Revolution/The Lunar Society Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 17-18 / Student Proposals
12 Benjamin Franklin/Thomas Jefferson Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 20-21/ Student Proposals
13 The French Revolution Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 22 / Student Proposals
14 Edmund Burke/Jeremy Bentham/Robert Owen Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 23-24-25/ Student Proposals
15 Kant and Hegel Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press. Chapter 26/ Student Proposals
16 Final report None

 

Course Notes/Textbooks None
Suggested Readings/Materials Bronowski J. –B. Mazlish, (1960). Western Intellectual Tradition. New York:Harper Perennial Press.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
2
40
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
20
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
10
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
2
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
7
Final Exam
10
    Total
215

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

to be able to develop scientific expertise and capabilities in the field of design studies by using creative and critical thinking as well as research skills; innovatively contributing to the discipline through new ideas, 

X
2

to be able to comprehend the interaction across various disciplines related to the field of design reaching at original conclusions via using new and complex analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills,

X
3

to be able to develop new strategic approaches to solve unforeseen complex issues in design practice through integrative and creative elaboration,

X
4

to be able to conduct independent research, analyze scientific phenomena through a broad, deep and critical perspective, arrive at new syntheses and evaluations in design discipline,

X
5

to be able to publish scientific articles in reputable refereed journals, present papers in scientific conferences in the field of design and its sub-disciplines,

X
6

to be able to develop effective communication skills to scientifically present and defend original ideas to an expert audience,

X
7

to be able to conduct affective team work in the field of design,

X
8

to be able to use the English language fluently for both comprehending scientific publications and developing proper communication with foreign colleagues,

X
9

to be able to contribute to the process of transforming into an " information society", by following the technological, social and cultural developments on both academic and professional grounds continuously,

X
10

to be able to develop skills of designing and producing unique models and products that will be certificated as registered design, trade mark and patents.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest