MCS 553 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Media, Ideology and Representation
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 553
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The course introduces and evaluates a range of poststructuralist, postMarxist, and psychoanalytic theories of ideology and discourse and representation. Its aim is to teach the students how to apply key theoretical and methodological approaches in analysis of specific media texts.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop close reading skills through an extensive reviewing of all the major categories of mass media texts.
  • to be able to use critical tools drawn from the structuralist, poststructuralist and Marxist theories in the analysis of the media texts.
  • to be able to asses and analyse media texts in terms of how meaning, ideology, identities, and power structures are (re)produced and represented.
  • demonstrate how various kinds of signifying practices represent and reconstruct aspects of our reality, our view of the world, and our view of ourselves and of others.
  • to be able reapply the critics’ analysis of a given text to their own initial observation.
Course Content It involves exploring the main theories of ideology, discourse and representation in media studies. An important part of the course is devoted to the use of a wide variety of texts, such as film, TV shows, music, ads and newspaper articles to explore meaning production in relation to ideology, hegemony, power and resistance. The aim is to develop students’ ability to analyse texts and critically discuss processes of meaning production in media texts in a sociocultural context.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Overview of the Course
2 A general overview of the Critical Media Studies. Representation, Meaning and Language B. L.Ott and R.L. Mack (2010), “Cultural Analysis”, Critical Media Studies: An Introduction”, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; S. Hall (ed.) (1997) Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices, Open University. Myra Macdonald (2007), “Discourse and Representation” and “Discourse and Ideology”, in Exploring Media Discourse, Arnold. 9—26 and 27-51. M. Foucault (1982) The Archaeology of Knowledge and the Discourse on Language. M. Gibson (2007), “With respect to Foucault” in Culture and Power, Oxford: Berg, 17-34.
3 Overview the Structuralism/Post-Structuralism and their influence in Communication Studies Storey (2001), “Structuralism and Post-structuralism”, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Essex: Prentice Hall. Terry Eagleton, “Structuralism” and “Post-Structuralism” in Literarary Theory: An Introduction, 2nd ed. Blacwell, 79-130.
4 Ideology, hegemony and power Stuart Hall (1990), “The rediscovery of ‘ideology’: return of the repressed in Media Studies” in M. Gurevitch, T. Benett, J. Curran and J. Woollacott (eds.), Culture, Society and the Media, New York: Routledge. Louis Althusser (2006), “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes Towards an Investigation)”, M.G.Durham and D. Kellner (eds.) in Media and Cultural Studies KeyWorks, 79-88. T. Schirato and S. Yell (2000) “Ideology”, Communication and Culture: An Introduction,Sage, 70-85. J. Torfing (1999), “Hegemony” in New Theories of Discourse: LCLu, Mouffe and Zizek, Blackwell, 101-119. Chris Barker (2002), “Truth, Science and Ideology” in Making Sense of Cultural Studies, Sage, 45-65.
5 Ideology, hegemony and power Stuart Hall (1990), “The rediscovery of ‘ideology’: return of the repressed in Media Studies” in M. Gurevitch, T. Benett, J. Curran and J. Woollacott (eds.), Culture, Society and the Media, New York: Routledge. Louis Althusser (2006), “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes Towards an Investigation)”, M.G.Durham and D. Kellner (eds.) in Media and Cultural Studies KeyWorks, 79-88. T. Schirato and S. Yell (2000) “Ideology”, Communication and Culture: An Introduction,Sage, 70-85. J. Torfing (1999), “Hegemony” in New Theories of Discourse: LCLu, Mouffe and Zizek, Blackwell, 101-119. Chris Barker (2002), “Truth, Science and Ideology” in Making Sense of Cultural Studies, Sage, 45-65.
6 Discourse theories Ernesto Laclau (2007)“Discourse”, R. Goodin, P. Pettit , T.Pogge (eds.) in A Companion to Contemporary Political Philisophy, Blacwell, 481-487. J. Torfing (1999), “Discourse” in New Theories of Discourse: LCLu, Mouffe and Zizek, Blackwell, 84-100. Teun A. Van Dijk (?) “Structures of Discourse and Structures of Power” Communication Yearbook 12, 18-59. C. Barker and D. Galasinski (2001), “Language, Culture and Discourse” in Cultural Studies and Discourse Analysis, Sage, 1-27.
7 Discourse theories Ernesto Laclau (2007)“Discourse”, R. Goodin, P. Pettit , T.Pogge (eds.) in A Companion to Contemporary Political Philisophy, Blacwell, 481-487. J. Torfing (1999), “Discourse” in New Theories of Discourse: LCLu, Mouffe and Zizek, Blackwell, 84-100. Teun A. Van Dijk (?) “Structures of Discourse and Structures of Power” Communication Yearbook 12, 18-59. C. Barker and D. Galasinski (2001), “Language, Culture and Discourse” in Cultural Studies and Discourse Analysis, Sage, 1-27.
8 Subject(ivity) and identity K. Woodward (1997).Identity and Difference, Sage: London. C. Weedon (2004), “Subjectivity and Identity”, in Identity and Culture” Naratives of Difference and Belonging. Open Univ. Press, 6-21. John Phillips (2000), “Psychoanalysis” in Contested Knowledge, Zed Books. 144-176. T. Schirato and S. Yell (2000) “Subjectivity”, Communication and Culture: An Introduction, Sage, 87-105. Terry Eagleton, “Psychoanalysis” in Literary Theory: An Introduction, 2nd ed. Blacwell, 79-130 and 130-168.
9 Text and deconstruction John Phillips (2000), “Derrida and Deconstruction” in Contested Knowledge, Zed Books. 176-206. Garry Hall (2006), “Cultural Studies and Deconstruction”, in New Cultural Studies, 29-31.
10 New understanding of Commmunication/Media J. Torfing (1999), “The Politics of Mass Media” in New Theories of Discourse: LacLau, Mouffe and Zizek, Blackwell, 210-224.
11 Presentations of the Essays
12 Presentations of the Essays
13 Presentations of the Essays
14 Presentations of the Essays- Final Homework
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Lectures and the readings listed in the weekly schedule.
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
20
Presentation / Jury
1
2
Project
1
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
Final Exam
21
    Total
146

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and ultimately deepen the level of theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the discipline of media and communication studies,

X
2

To be able to carry on learning and conduct advanced research independently by critically evaluating knowledge in the field of media and communication,

X
3

To be able to utilize theoretical and practical knowledge at an expert level in the field of media and communication when developing plans, strategies, and policies,

X
4

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in the area of communication in daily life,

X
5

To be able to grasp the interdisciplinary qualities of media and communication studies,

X
6

To be able to combine the knowledge of the media and communication field with knowledge from various related disciplines to form new knowledge in order to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and research methods to solve critical problems,

X
7

To be able to critically investigate social relations and the forms and norms of communication that constitute these relations while being to take action to improve and, when necessary, change these relations,

X
8

To be able to act with special concern for social and scientific values, as well as ethical principles, during the collection, interpretation, and publication of data related to the field of media and communication, and to take action to disseminate these values,

X
9

To be able to reconstruct a problem in the media and communication field as an academic problem, in order to conduct research, generate methods of solution, and evaluate results,

X
10

To be able to make use of foreign language for learning new knowledge in the media and communication field and to communicate with foreign colleagues,

11

To be able to communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in media and communication to groups inside and outside the discipline,

12

To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest