PSIR 636 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Foreign Policy Literature in Turkey
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 636
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Third Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce graduate students to the literature on Turkish foreign policy.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • explain dominant theoretical perspectives in TFP literature
  • identify the factors that dominate the literature
  • discuss the area studies in TFP literature with a critical perspective
  • analyze the changes in TFP literature over time
  • identify the effects of structural changes in the international arena on the TFP literature
Course Content This advanced course discusses some of the major concepts and theoretical approaches in the subfield of Turkish foreign policy analysis. The course explains the which factors –related to domestic, regional, and international dynamics- and which methods are utilized in the literature explaining Turkish foreign policy.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Key issues in TFP 1- Benli- Altunışık, M. and Ö. Tür. Turkey: Challenges of Continuity and Change, Routledge, 2005, pp: 88-133. 2- B. Oran, Turkish Foreign Policy: 1919-2006 Facts and Analyses with Documents, Utah Series and Turkish and Islamic Studies (2010), pp 3-23. 3- Mustafa Aydın. “Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy: Changing Patterns and Conjunctures during the Cold War”, Middle East Studies, vol. 36, no. 1 (January 2000), pp. 103-139.
3 Dominance of Realism 1- Ali Karaosmanoğlu, "The Evolution of the National Security Culture and the Military in Turkey," Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 54, No. 1 (Fall 2000), pp. 199-216. 2- Cenk Saraçoğlu, “Türk Tarihyazımında Soğuk Savaş ve Türkiye-SSCB ilişkileri” [Cold War and the Historiography of Soviet-Turkish Relations], Praksis, 17 (2007), pp: 57-69
4 Liberalism and Economic Issues 1- Kemal Kirişci. "Turkey's Engagement with Its Neighborhood", Turkish Studies, vol. 13, no. 3 (September 2012), pp. 319-341. 2- Kemal Kirişçi, “The Transformation of Turkish Foreign Policy: The Rise of the Trading State”, New Perspectives on Turkey, No: 40, (2009), p. 29-57. 3- Carol R. Savietz, “Tangled Pipelines: Turkey’s Role in Energy Export Plans,” Turkish Studies (March 2009), 95-108. 4- C. Sidar & G. Winrow “Turkey and South Stream: Turco-Russian Rapprochement and the Future of the Southern Corridor” Turkish Foreign Policy Quarterly, Vol. 10, No 2. (2011), pp. 51-61.
5 Area Studies in TFP Literature: Relations with USA 1- Stephen Larrabe and Ian O. Lesser, “Turkey and the United States,” Turkish Foreign Policy in an Age of Uncertainty, pp. 159-184. 2- James E. Kapsis, “From Desert Storm to Metal Storm: How Iraq Has Spoiled US-Turkish Relations,” Current History (November 2005), pp. 380-388. 3- Kemal Kirişçi, “Arab Uprisings and Completing Turkey’s Regional Integration: Challenges and Opportunities for US-Turkish Relations,” Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, Vol. 15, No. 2 (2013), pp. 189-205.
6 Area Studies in TFP Literature: Middle East 1- Meliha Benli Altunışık and Lenore Martin, “Making Sense of Turkish Foreign Policy in the Middle East,” Turkish Studies, Vol. 12, No. 4, (2011), pp. 569-588. 2- Ziya Öniş, “Turkey and the Arab Spring: Between Ethics and Self-Interest,” Insight Turkey, Vol. 14, No. 3 (2012), pp. 45-63.
7 Area Studies in TFP Literature: Central Asia 1- Mustafa Aydın, “Foucault’s Pendulum: Turkey in Central Asia and the Caucasus,” Turkish Studies, Summer 2004: 1-22. 2- Carol R. Saivetz, “Tangled Pipelines: Turkey’s Role in Energy Export Plans,” Turkish Studies, March 2009: 95-108.
8 Area Studies in TFP Literature: The European Factor 1- Aydın, Mustafa (2003) ‘The Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy, and Turkey’s European Vocation’ The Review of International Affairs 3(2):306-331. 2- Müftüler-Baç, Meltem. “Turkish Political Science and European Integration”, Journal of European Public Policy 10: 4 August 2003, pp: 655-663 3- M. Muftuler, Y. Gursoy “Is There a Europeanization of Turkish Foreign Policy? An Addendum to the Literature on EU Candidates”. Turkish Studies, vol. 11, no. 3, 405–427. Routledge. 2010.
9 New Methods and Debates in TFP Literature No readings
10 Role of Bureucracy Philip Robins, Suits and Uniforms: Turkish Foreign Policy Since the Cold War (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2003), pp. 68-92.
11 Leadership 1- Behlül Özkan, “Turkey, Davutoğlu and the Idea of Pan-Islamism,” Survival, Vol. 56, No. 4cs (August-September 2014), pp. 119-140. 2- Ramazan Gözen. “Turgut Özal and Turkish Foreign Policy: Style and Vision”, Dış Politika/Foreign Policy, vol. 20, nos. 3-4 (1996), pp. 69-101. 3- Sedat Laçiner. "Özalism (Neo-Ottomanism): An Alternative in Turkish Foreign Policy?" (34 pp.)
12 Islamicized TFP? 1- Ahmet Davutoğlu, “Turkey’s Foreign Policy Vision: An Assessment of 2007”, Insight Turkey, VoL. 10, No: 1, (2008), p. 77-96. 2- Ahmet Davutoğlu. "Zero Problems in a New Era", Foreign Policy (21 March 2013).
13 Islamicized TFP? II 1- Faruk Yalvaç. "Strategic Depth or Hegemonic Depth? A Critical Realist Analysis of Turkey's Position in the World System", International Relations, vol. 26, no. 2 (June 2012), pp. 165-180.
14 Concluding Remarks
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks Reading Material and power point presentations
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
18
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
75
Presentation / Jury
1
85
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
250

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to improve and deepen the theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations.

X
2

To be able to evaluate critically and analytically the relationships between various factors in the discipline of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture at an advanced level.

X
3

To be able to determine the theoretical and empirical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature and gain the ability of questioning at an advanced level.

X
4

To be able to gain the ability to develop innovative, leading and original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature.

X
5

To be able to gather, analyze, and interpret the data by using advanced qualitative or quantitative research methods in Political Science and International Relations.

X
6

To be able to develop original academic works and publish scientific articles in refereed national or international indexed journals in the field of Political Science and International Relations.

X
7

To be able to describe individual research and contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations in written, oral, and visual forms.

X
8

To be able to take responsibility in an individual capacity and/or as part of a team in generating innovative and analytical solutions to the problems that arise in relation to the politics in daily life.

9

To be able to develop projects in determining the institutional and political instruments for conflict resolution in national and international politics.

X
10

To be able to prepare an original thesis in Political Science and International Relations based on scientific criteria.

11

To be able to follow new research and developments, publish scientific articles and participate the debates in academic meetings in Political Science and International Relations through a foreign language.

X
12

To be able to have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of gathering, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations. 

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest