PSIR 562 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Art and Politics in the Modern Era
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 562
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
7.5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
Second Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims both at addressing the approaches of the political authorities to art in the modern era and at analyzing the relations various artistic groups and/or movements with the political power. This course has the claim that the prevailing political and cultural atmosphere of each era influences art with a historical and sociological perspective.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Classify the ideologies that different artistic movements engage with
  • Compare and contrast various dictatorships according to the artistic preferences
  • Discuss the changes in the artistic discourses within the broader social and political framework
  • Describe at least two modern artistic currents by relating them to the agendas of politics in which they are born of
  • Discuss the functions of art for the interests of political authorities
  • Discuss the potential of art in challenging the existing power relations in society
Course Content By following a chronological line, we are going to examine the interactions between the artistic sphere and politics in the framework of the topics such as modernization, nation-building, nationalism, World Wars, dictatorships, ideologies, Cold War, late-industrialization, identity politics, globalization and transnationalism.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction: Course objectives, content, methodology Presentation and overview of the course.
2 Art and Politics? Conceptual framework: Modernity, modernism, modernization Matei Calinescu, “The Idea of Modernity”, Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism, Durham: Duke University Press, 1987, pp.13-94. Suggested Reading: Lev Kreft, “Sanatın Siyaseti ve Siyasetin Sanatı”, içinde Ali Artun (der.), Sanat/Siyaset: Kültür Çağında Sanat ve Kültürel Politika, İletişim Yay. 2008, pp. 9 - 48.
3 Modernism Marshall Berman, “Modernity-Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”, All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity, New York: Penguin Books, 1988, pp. 15 - 36.
4 World Wars I & II, and the Avant-garde Kenneth Silver, Esprit de Corps: The Art of the Parisian Avant-Garde and the First World War: 1914-1925, London: Thames and Hudson, 1989. Romy Golan, Modernity and Nostalgia: Art and Politics in France Between the Wars, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995.
5 Populism, Ideology and Art Eric Hobsbawm, “Foreword”, in, (eds.) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 11-15. Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
6 Dictatorships I (1930-1945) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, “Selectors’ Introduction”, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 16-30. Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
7 Dictatorships II (1930-1945) Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997, Chapters 2&3, pp.47-102.
8 Midterm Exam
9 Late-industrialization and modernization Mary Matossian, “Ideologies of Delayed Development”, in (der.) J. Hutchinson and A. D. Smith, Nationalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 218-225. Sibel Bozdoğan, “Art and Architecture in Modern Turkey: The Republican Period”, in (der.) Reşat Kasaba, The Cambridge History of Turkey: Vol. 4: Turkey in the Modern World, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp. 419-471.
10 Nation-building and Modernism Duygu Köksal, “Domesticating the Avant-Garde in a Nationalist Era: Aesthetic Modernism in 1930s Turkey”, New Perspectives on Turkey, Vol 52, 2015, pp. 29-53. Cemren Altan, “Visual Narration of a Nation: Painting and National Identity in Turkey”, Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, Vol.4, No.2, 2004, pp. 2-17.
11 Cold War Serge Guilbaut, “Introduction”, How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art?, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983, pp. 1-16. Frances Stonor Saunders, “Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’”, Independent, 21 October 2005.
12 Post-Colonialism and Identity politics Ania Loomba, “Defining the Terms”, Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Routledge, New York, 1998, pp. 1-19. Hannah Elansary, “Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse.”, Jadaliyya, 1 September 2014.
13 Globalization, transnationalism and contemporary art Dessislava Dimova and Eckhart J. Gillen, “Globalization and Cultural Identity: The perspective of Contemporary Art”, background paper,Salzburg trilogy,Bertelsmann Sitftung, 2017, pp. 60-71. Justin O'Connor, and Gu Xin. "A new modernity? The arrival of ‘creative industries’ in China." International journal of cultural studies 9.3 (2006), pp. 271-283. Brettany Shannon. “The ‘Dubai Effect’: The Gulf, the art world and globalization”, The Emerging Asian City: Concomitant Urbanities & Urbanisms, 2013, pp.254-264.
14 Review of the semester
15 Final Exam
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

Ania Loomba, “Defining the Terms”, Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Routledge, New York, 1998, pp. 1-19.

Brettany Shannon. “The ‘Dubai Effect’: The Gulf, the art world and globalization”, The Emerging Asian City: Concomitant Urbanities & Urbanisms, 2013, pp.254-264.

Cemren Altan, “Visual Narration of a Nation: Painting and National Identity in Turkey”, Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, Vol.4, No.2, 2004, pp. 2-17.

Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, “Selectors’ Introduction”, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 16-30.

Dessislava Dimova and Eckhart J. Gillen, “Globalization and Cultural Identity: The perspective of Contemporary Art”, background paper,Salzburg trilogy,Bertelsmann Sitftung, 2017, pp. 60-71.

Duygu Köksal, “Domesticating the Avant-Garde in a Nationalist Era: Aesthetic Modernism in 1930s Turkey”, New Perspectives on Turkey, Vol 52, 2015, pp. 29-53.

Edward Said, Orientalism, Vintage Books, 1978.

Eric Hobsbawm, “Foreword”, in, (eds.) Dawn Ades, Tim Benton, David Elliott, Iain Boyd Whyte, Art and Power: Europe Under Dictators 1930-1945, London: Thames and Hudson, 1995, pp. 11-15.

Frances Stonor Saunders, “Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’”, Independent, 21 October 2005.

Hannah Elansary, “Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse.”, Jadaliyya, 1 September 2014.

Justin O'Connor, and Gu Xin. "A new modernity? The arrival of ‘creative industries’ in China." International journal of cultural studies 9.3 (2006), pp. 271-283.

Kenneth Silver, Esprit de Corps: The Art of the Parisian Avant-Garde and the First World War: 1914-1925, London: Thames and Hudson, 1989.

Marshall Berman, “Modernity-Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”, All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity, New York: Penguin Books, 1988, pp. 15-36.

 

Mary Matossian, “Ideologies of Delayed Development”, içinde (der.) J. Hutchinson ve A. D. Smith, Nationalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 218-225.

 

Matei Calinescu, “The Idea of Modernity”, Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism, Durham: Duke University Press, 1987, pp.13-94.

 

Romy Golan, Modernity and Nostalgia: Art and Politics in France Between the WarsNew Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995.

 

Serge Guilbaut, How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art?, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.

 

Sibel Bozdoğan, “Art and Architecture in Modern Turkey: The Republican Period”, içinde (der.) Reşat Kasaba, The Cambridge History of Turkey: Vol. 4: Turkey in the Modern World, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp. 419-471.

 

Toby Clark, Art and Propaganda in the Twentieth Century, Abrams, New York, 1997.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
10
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
15
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
12
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
5
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exam
1
40
    Total
201

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To improve theoretical and conceptual proficiencies on Political Science and International Relations and to ultimately deepen and develop intellectual interest X
2 To evaluate the relationships between factors in the field of Political Science and International Relations such as structures, actors, institutions and culture in a critical perspective  X
3 To provide advanced competences to determine and question the theoretical and emprical gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature  X
4 To identify the political and cultual conditions that generate discrimination mechanisms based on race, ethnic groups, gender and religion at national and international levels  X
5 To provide competences to develop original arguments in order to fill the gaps in Political Science and International Relations literature X
6 To determine, collect, resolve, and interpret the data that would measure the theories and concepts as variables by using scientific research methods in Political Science and International Relations field X
7 To use confidently the terms and concepts of Political Science and International Relations  X
8 To communicate systematically, in written, oral, and visual forms, contemporary developments in Political Science and International Relations to groups inside and outside the said discipline  X
9 To take responsibility in an individual capacity and as part of a team in generating solutions to unexpected problems that arise in relation to politics in daily life  X
10 To develop projects determining the institutional and political instruments for management of domestic and international conflicts  X
11 To prepare an orginal thesis/term project about Political Science and International Relations in accordance with scentific criteria  X
12 To design and carry out a scientific research project in the field of Political Science and International Relations  X
13 To have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of collecting, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data relevant to Political Science and International Relations  X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest